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[#] Tue Jan 04 2011 21:10:19 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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it wouldn't even have to have that many of them, because you're fingers aren't sensitive enough to pick up on 800x600 on a 4 inch screen, so you would only need enough to define relativaly large sections of screen, certainly not as many pixels as the display has.

[#] Wed Jan 05 2011 07:18:32 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

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The theremin doesn't have any resistance, either; you just wave your hands over a pair of antennae to modify pitch and volume.  But it's also notoriously difficult to play.



[#] Wed Jan 05 2011 23:20:53 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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From what I've read, you can now buy gloves that have special patches

on the fingertips designed to work with multi-touch screens such as
found on the iPhone, iPad, etc.

I'd much rather have a stylus-capable screen than a multitouch-capable screen.
Alas, even my lowly G1 is multitouch.

Where's the Koala Pad when you need it?

[#] Thu Jan 06 2011 13:48:14 EST from Spell Binder @ Uncensored

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Ya know what kind of interface has impressed me? The controllers that come with my son's V-Smile game console. It's clearly designed for kids, and most likely wouldn't have anywhere near the precision to be useful in any serious games, but there are a few touches that I really like about it.

The controller for the first-gen V-Smile has a joystick, four color-coded buttons, an enter button, a help button, a cancel button, and a built-in drawing pad with pen. The nice touches are that the controller has a nook to store the pen when not in use, and the joystick can be repositioned to the other side of the drawing pad to accomodate left-handed users.

The second-gen V-Smile controller drops the drawing pad in favor of wireless connectivity and motion-control, but is still has an option to rotate the buttons around to accomodate left-handed users.

I realize that Sony, Micrsoft, and Nintendo put a lot of R&D effort into their controllers, but it just seems blatanly duh that they couldn't come up with simple solutions like the V-Smile did.
V-Binder

[#] Thu Jan 06 2011 23:24:41 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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I always thought that the flippable controller was a very clever design.

[#] Fri Jan 07 2011 00:38:23 EST from Sig @ Uncensored

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I really miss the pseudowriting (Graffiti) on the old Palms.  I was really fast with that on my old M100.



[#] Fri Jan 07 2011 16:58:41 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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I really miss the pseudowriting (Graffiti) on the old Palms.  I was
really fast with that on my old M100.

And it didn't bother you that you had to conform to the machine because the machine couldn't conform to you?

[#] Sat Jan 08 2011 12:54:39 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Ideologically it did have that problem, but there was something elegant about Palm's graffiti input. I certainly would prefer it over an on-screen keyboard.

[#] Sat Jan 08 2011 15:03:29 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

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hm, there was an alternative input method, which proposed to be much faster...

one would start in the center, andmove into any of the 8 directions (up, upright....) and then left/right and back to the center; it would choose a letter by that.

since you don't have to lift your pen, much faster.

since it was patented, nobody implemented it.



[#] Sun Jan 09 2011 12:31:58 EST from Sig @ Uncensored

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Fri Jan 07 2011 04:58:41 PM EST from Ford II @ Uncensored
I really miss the pseudowriting (Graffiti) on the old Palms.  I was
really fast with that on my old M100.

And it didn't bother you that you had to conform to the machine because the machine couldn't conform to you?

I feel that way about most of my interpersonal reactions, but I'm willing to compromise with my computers.



[#] Sun Jan 09 2011 13:42:51 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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thats funny. im the opposite. we built the machine we houldnt have to conform to it.

[#] Sun Jan 09 2011 13:49:40 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

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So Jan 09 2011 13:42:51 EST von Ford II @ Uncensored Betreff: Re:
thats funny. im the opposite. we built the machine we houldnt have to conform to it.

hey, I'm a huge fan of "the machine has adopt to me, not me to the machine."



[#] Mon Jan 10 2011 14:18:47 EST from Spell Binder @ Uncensored

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Ideologically, I'd agree that the machine should adapt to us. However, I've used some systems where learning the way the machine wants to do things increased my efficiency tremendously.

The example I like to use are IBM's 5080 and 6090 graphics terminals for use with their CADAM and CATIA software. For those not familiar, CADAM was IBM's mainframe-based 2D drawing software targeted at the architectural and engineering industries. CATIA was IBM's 3D modelling software.

Anyways. Both the 5080 and the 6090, fully equipped, came with a standard keyboard, drawing tablet with a mouse-like "puck," a secondary keypad with a grid of programmable LED-lit buttons called (strangely enough) the Lighted Programmable Function Keypad (LPFK), and another pad with eight knobs (or dials) arranged in a 2x4 grid.

It took some getting used to, but once I learned the basics of how to operate the software, I could churn out drawings at an amazing speed. It was a simple matter of using the puck to select an object, and then pressing the right button on the LPFK to set an end-point, or set the radius of a circle, etc.
Right hand on the puck, left hand on the LPFK. No need to move my hands from device to device, no need to look down to see what button I'm hitting.

Though I've never used AutoDesk, or another PC-based drafting tool, I can't make any broad claims, but I have a hard time imagining how I could be that efficient using a typical mouse and keyboard setup.
5080 Binder

[#] Mon Jan 10 2011 17:45:16 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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I like to think of it as, the machine makes apparent to us a better way of doing something.

[#] Mon Jan 10 2011 18:17:53 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

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having done

- some autocad work (acad 10...)

- eagle (pcb layout)

- co-authored a homebrew IC-Layout program

I can just say, use the mouse to get an aproximate position, and use the keyboard to snap to rasters, splins or whatever.

Have a descent commandline completion as in autocad, or just defined rules (as a process description how far structures may be next to each other)

And you're faster then with mouse, tablet or keyboard alone.



[#] Tue Jan 11 2011 00:49:36 EST from Harbard @ Uncensored

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I have an engineer friend that would totally agree with you.  We both came to the conclusion that the keyboard/mouse setup is totally wrong for spreadsheets.  You need the numeric key pad on the left or use the mose left handed.  Every time I build a spread sheet  I am constantly having to take my hand off the key pad to move the mouse or vice versa.  My friend Bill has even gone so far as to get a USB key pad and has learned to operate it left handed.



[#] Tue Jan 11 2011 06:06:31 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

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heh... I actualy own standalone keypads.

my cherry g-80-5000 has a ps2 plug to attach one.

but since I almost never enter huge amounts of numbers, its simply resting in some drawer and collecting dust for 10 years now.

The only spreadsheed I regulary have to service is the hour-plan at $work; which, yes, is pain in the ass to operate.

I therefore filed a bugreport to openoffice to have a scroll-lock support so the spreadsheet moves, and the cursor remains in the same place...

nobody seems to find it usefull. So i'll continue hating spreadsheets.



[#] Tue Jan 11 2011 14:16:00 EST from Spell Binder @ Uncensored

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The scroll lock key is, IMHO, an underused function. I've run across a number of applications where scroll lock could be used--albeit with slightly different behaviors.

The first are terminal-style applications with a scroll-back buffer. The decent terminal apps have options to control auto-jumping when you've scrolled back through the buffer, but why not just use scroll lock? When scroll lock is on, you can scroll anywhere in the buffer with out auto-jumping occurring.
Turn off scroll lock, and the next thing the terminal prints auto-jumps to the current cursor position.

As bart just mentioned, scroll lock could also be useful in spreadsheets and text editors where you want to cursor to remain in a fixed position on screen while scrolling the document underneath.
Scroll Binder

[#] Wed Jan 12 2011 16:58:04 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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I like to think of it as, the machine makes apparent to us a better way

of doing something.

This is true, in fact our written characters are kinda lame and in some cases completely ambiguous.
But I come from the starting point of the computer exists to aid the human.
Yes if the computer makes it obvious that there are better ways to do things maybe we should do them. In this case, we should change our writing to match grafitti, but until we do that, the machine should conform to us, we shouldn't have to learn two.

[#] Wed Jan 12 2011 17:00:17 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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nobody seems to find it usefull. So i'll continue hating
spreadsheets.

The common shortcut for this in some editors I play with is ctrl-arrows moves the screen not the cursor as you suggest.
I tried it in openoffice and it zoomed to the edge of the sheet. I think the scroll is a better use of the control key.
using scroll lock might make more sense, but it's two extra button pushes for a button that's out of the way.

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