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[#] Fri Apr 08 2005 13:44:55 EDT from Freakdog @ Dog Pound BBS II

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Well, I've been a RedHat/Fedora user, but some of the seeming unilateral decisions being made by the Fedora team are starting to leave a bad taste in my mouth.



FWIW, I'm considering switching to SuSe.

[#] Fri Apr 08 2005 14:07:38 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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I've got FreeBSD running in a VMware box right now. Sometime next week I hope to have enough of the "ports" build finished so that I'll actually be able to do something with it. So far, FreeBSD is reminding me why I don't use Gentoo.

[#] Fri Apr 08 2005 14:52:25 EDT from Peter Pulse @ Uncensored

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I'm running Fedora 'cause I'm a lazy mofo. But I really don't care as long as it works for me.. any linux distro is ok. Other *ix besides linux is ok too, though at this stage of the game linux is really preferrable.

[#] Fri Apr 08 2005 15:05:58 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

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I think most of us here are now well past the age of 'old enough to realize that we just want to get things done and fuckering around with installing OSes and watching gentoo build shit is just annoying.'

[#] Fri Apr 08 2005 15:55:28 EDT from Ian M. Shot @ Haven BBS

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I use mainly Debian releases (Mepis, Knoppix, Debian itself). However it really doesn't matter much to me. I have used (in no particular order): Slackware, Red Hat, Mandrake, SunOS, Solairs, OpenBSD, NetBSD, AIX, SCO (YUCK! and not because of the lawsuits, it was bad prior to that), Digital/UX, Trans-Ameritech Linux, and FreeBSD.

I'll try/use anything at least once. Hell I worked with 3 different version of OS/2.

[#] Fri Apr 08 2005 20:13:54 EDT from Ragnar Danneskjold @ Uncensored

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Okay, now that most of the players have chimed in.....

Why the distro you're using? What differentiates it from another for you?

If you're using BSD, why not Linux?

If you're using Linux, why not BSD?

[#] Fri Apr 08 2005 22:19:59 EDT from Oppie Taylor @ Uncensored

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What package would take the most time to compile. I think I want to put my 200 Mhz Fedora Core 3 box to the test of compiling something. Something that will take 5 or more days. :)

[#] Fri Apr 08 2005 23:33:30 EDT from Ian M. Shot @ Haven BBS

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Ragnar: I use Mepis for desktop/laptops and Debian for servers. Mainly for the package management on both sides (Mepis being a Debian variant).

As far as Mepis goes, liveCD distro makes it nice to test the hardware before installing. Installation is a snap. I like the features it comes with. The only problem I have had with it is the Wireless tools need to be better.

As far as Debian goes, installation has been easy, I can keep the server up to date pretty easy. Over all it is mainly the package management. I really dislike RPM after using Redhat and Mandrake.

As far as why not *BSD, I didn't like the BSDs as much as I liked Linux.

[#] Sat Apr 09 2005 00:25:57 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Oppie: the longest build I know of is OpenOffice. I haven't compiled it myself but I've heard that it takes a very long time even on modern hardware.

[#] Sat Apr 09 2005 07:02:50 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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I think I've already mentioned why, but I'll iterate.

I moved to FreeBSD after having been hacked a couple of times using Linux.
I couldn't keep up with the updates in Linux.

And I haven't tried the latest Linux, just because I haven't... I'd already made the move to FreeBSD.

[#] Sat Apr 09 2005 10:28:25 EDT from Mr.T @ Uncensored

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I think I've already mentioned why, but I'll iterate.
^^^^^^^

Twenty fucking thousand (a number of greater magnitude than 20,000 on its
own) points for fleeb!

[#] Sun Apr 10 2005 10:08:00 EDT from alex snow @ Uncensored

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I usua..y stick with slackware though I've used debian, freebsd, netbsd, and Ultrix (just for fun). Slackware has everything I need and is mostly console based which I like, though it's easy to get a desktop installed. I didn't really like bsd because it was missing a lot of the software I'm used to having installed by default on linux.

[#] Sun Apr 10 2005 12:12:50 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Over the last two decades I've used just about every unix out there. I started on Xenix (a Microsoft product ... go figure) and over the years worked my way through all of SCO's products and more minicomputers than I can count ... Dynix/ptx, Ultrix (later Tru64), AIX, SunOS/Solaris, HP/UX, and others whose names I can't even remember anymore -- I used them all.

I started using Linux in 1994, after Peter Pulse made a set of Slackware diskettes for me to install from. Bruce Perens was right: it's like playing a musical instrument. You can learn how to play the piano, for example, while using a poor quality instrument, and then one day you get your hands on a Steinway (Linux) and suddenly it's as if you're a better player -- your fingers just fly across the keyboard. Everything in Linux was "just right."

I've tried all the free versions of BSD and I remain singularly unimpressed.
There was a time when FreeBSD handled a heavily loaded system more gracefully than Linux, but those days are over. There was a time when FreeBSD handled security updates more automatically than Linux, but those days are over as well (yum/apt and automatic updates make this stuff just work).

If it weren't for the AT&T lawsuit, all the amenities that went into Linux would have gone into FreeBSD instead, and there would never have been any need for Linux in the first place. The end result would have been somewhat similar, so it didn't/doesn't really matter. I've installed FreeBSD as recently as last week, and it still appears to me as a Linux-like system with a different kernel and most of the pre-installed amenities missing. I just don't see the point. Users don't care.

I also don't see the point in having a hundred different Linux distributions.
Different menu layouts and different packaging systems are not enough to justify the fragmentation. I use Fedora simply because there's a lot of energy behind it and it's frequently updated, but again, it doesn't really matter.
It's all the same stuff.

[#] Tue Apr 12 2005 16:34:01 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

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If you're using Linux, why not BSD?

familiarity bleeds contempt or something like that.
Go with what you know. that's me.

[#] Tue Apr 12 2005 16:38:32 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

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I also don't see the point in having a hundred different Linux
distributions. Different menu layouts and different packaging systems

are not enough to justify the fragmentation. I use Fedora simply
because there's a lot of energy behind it and it's frequently updated,

but again, it doesn't really matter. It's all the same stuff.

You bring up two interesting points, which are both good and bad:
There is no point in hundreds of different distros except that, hey competition is good, and if you think you can do better, go ahead, just because there's 100 out there, doesn't mean you can't ignore 99 of them. But thusly it is annoying that if you want a distro that does *this* then you have a lot of crap to weed through. But the popular ones are popular because they're the most worked on and easiest to use.
And the matter of frequently updated, same thing fleeb said. Today I found out that modules.conf is gone.
it's damn fucking annoying that every single minor release has something or most things changed.
I HATE THAT. But that's me. The thing is, the kids doing this are still gentoo-like dweebs and think it's really cool to know all the stupid trivialities of each distro nuance.
I just want to write software and communicate.

[#] Tue Apr 12 2005 16:59:53 EDT from Peter Pulse @ Uncensored

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modules.conf is gone? So how is it done now?

[#] Tue Apr 12 2005 17:35:51 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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It's still there, but with a 2.6 kernel it's caleld modprobe.conf. I don't know why.

Oh and Ford, you're basically making the argument in favor of things like Red Hat Enterprise Linux -- that's what CIO's are asking for (and RH is delivering) -- a distribution that stays stable, doesn't change things randomly, and is supported as-is for a long time (in this case, 6 years).

[#] Tue Apr 12 2005 17:45:45 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

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doesn't sound so bad to me.

[#] Tue Apr 12 2005 17:59:02 EDT from Magus @ Uncensored

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Going back a couple days, OpenOffice is a good choice if you want to tie your computer up compiling for a few days. It took one or two on my P-III 750 (192 MB RAM), and 2-3 days on my AMD-K6-2 (475 MHz, 128 MB). Should be about what you're looking for, Oppie.

[#] Wed Apr 13 2005 00:08:09 EDT from athos-mn @ Uncensored

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I was thinking about looking into the free (or at least less expensive donation-ware) alternatives to RHEL, like CentOS, at least for my few clients who are interested in Linux - but I really don't have enough clients to justify it (yet), let alone a fourth box (yet).

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