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[#] Mon Sep 21 2009 09:39:08 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

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nope, bare metal machine.
Got all my vm's and linux machines working.
Now I'm trying to take the old machine and make it a hackintosh.
There's definetly something wrong with the IDE controllers on that board though. I got a p4 on ebay for $25 so I'll see how that goes.

[#] Mon Sep 21 2009 11:54:40 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

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seems as if it soon may become an expensive thing to offer SSL encryption inside the US:

http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/09/09/18/apple_other_retailers_target_of_patent_infringement_suit.html



[#] Mon Sep 21 2009 12:00:00 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

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funny, why not sue google too?

[#] Wed Sep 23 2009 07:54:53 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

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http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/google_launches_chrome_frame_internet_explorer_plugin.php

now... I'd call that a cool thing.

<this page requires google chrome to be displayed. please install the google chrome plugin>

use the IE shell, but replace all the rest.



[#] Thu Sep 24 2009 00:06:43 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Hmmmm ... interesting, but if someone's willing to install that, wouldn't they be willing to simply install the Chrome browser?

It's almost like a "remove brokenness plugin"



[#] Thu Sep 24 2009 02:36:40 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

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its often quoted that companies have intranet applications which require an old (broken) version of IE

since you don't replace the renderengine totaly but just optional per frame, I think its better.

You also don't have to sync two sets of bookmarks/passvoids/... since it just displays using the chrome render engine, but the http client should still be m$



[#] Mon Sep 28 2009 09:03:21 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

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hm, fancy. dokuwiki makes ... that:

e2 80 a6



[#] Tue Sep 29 2009 07:44:37 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

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so be carefull exposing your webservice if you use SVN to manage your content... (hint: this probably is also true for CVS)

http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2009/09/25/svn-strikes-back-a-serious-vulnerability-found/



[#] Tue Sep 29 2009 12:26:30 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

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who on earth checks out anything from their source control system right into production?
Does nobody have a staging area?

[#] Tue Sep 29 2009 14:30:06 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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The problem is not that they go directly from svn to production, but that they use the checked out working copy *as* the production system.

For a traditional piece of software, the local equivalent of "make install" would bring over only the required files from the working copy to the production system directory. And of course there's nothing wrong with saying "r12345 has been fully tested; install it into production." Staging would be the same thing, except there's no need to move the actual files directly from the staging system to the production system.

For a "web app" written in an interpreted language designed for the web ... yes, I suppose there would be a very strong temptation to make the working copy and the production system's directory one and the same. If you do this and don't take measures to prevent the web server from serving up version control metadata, then you deserve to lose.

[#] Tue Sep 29 2009 20:06:35 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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systems like Perforce don't *have* client-side version control metadata, so there's that. I don't see a big problem with managing e.g. PHP apps via SCM systems.

For strict QA management of compiled software, I don't agree with managing one's QA process solely via SCM. If possible, if there aren't too many platforms to support, it's better to build RPMs or whatever and test the RPMs. Then you are more completely insulated from compiler bugs, environment discrepancies, or other human errors that might cause the build process to fail.

[#] Wed Sep 30 2009 08:07:29 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

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yack perforce! best way to render productivity to zarro.



[#] Wed Sep 30 2009 08:08:21 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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Sep 30 2009 8:07am from dothebart @uncnsrd
yack perforce! best way to render productivity to zarro.


not at all. but especially if you're using the ide plugin.

[#] Thu Oct 01 2009 16:08:05 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

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fancy. If I get it correctly, they use the DAV access in xchange to provide regular pop

http://sourceforge.net/projects/davmail/



[#] Sat Oct 03 2009 08:18:16 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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My graphics card is acting quite strangely.

I have an nVidia GeForce 9800 GTX graphics card.  It's supposed to be a fairly powerful card, and in fact, it can give me some truly beautiful graphics.

But, lately, since updating the drivers, and clearing out any dust in the computer, the thing has been freezing up, and blue-screening my computer.  I think it has been overheating, too.

I hate the idea of having to buy another graphics card, but I'm guessing it's the only thing I can do right now.



[#] Sat Oct 03 2009 12:06:02 EDT from Harbard @ Uncensored

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Try reseating the card and any cables.  Make sure you have plugged in the extra power connector to the video card if you need it.  I made that mistake once.



[#] Sat Oct 03 2009 14:32:22 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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downgrade the drivers to what they were before?

checked the nvidia control panel for the hardware monitoring? (I believe that all nvidia products have a temperature monitor. this used to be exposed by default in the nvidia control panel, but nowadays it's hidden and you have to enable it with a registry hack (google "coolbits registry tweak") or one of the various third party nvidia overclocking tools.)

fyi, the ATI 5850/5870 are newly available and MUCH faster than the 9800 gtx. even the ATI 4770 might be a reasonable choice (smaller card, but built on a 40nm process and should be very efficient)

[#] Sat Oct 03 2009 20:09:03 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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I tried removing the card, removing the 'shroud' around the card, and blowing out any possible dust therein... but the card still overheated.

So, I bought an eVGA GeForce GTX 275 card, figuring if it didn't address the problem, it would at least be an upgrade.

It overheats, too.

The driver apparently leads to overheating.

The card does come with a small cord that you plug into a GPIO header on the motherboard... if I could find such a thing on the motherboard, it might help.  I think it is used to help regulate the fan on the graphics card, making the fan blow harder when the card is used for gaming.



[#] Sun Oct 04 2009 18:45:02 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

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Never clean the dust out of a computer. It's like the muck in the car engine, you clean it out and it stops working.

[#] Sun Oct 04 2009 20:23:20 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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That might be the lesson to learn here, but in this case it was more a matter of updating the drivers that got me in trouble, I believe.



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