Language:
switch to room list switch to menu My folders
Go to page: First ... 25 26 27 28 [29] 30 31 32 33 ... Last
[#] Tue Feb 17 2009 14:38:24 EST from Peter Pulse @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Yes, your cable company can change your ip address at anytime. The ipdress

is assigned to the MAC address of your cable modem. So you can not be

confused with your neighbor. In fact you can several different ip addresses,

but only one ip address per MAC address which is hardware based. If you

check, the ip address the cable company assigns to you is different from
what
you computer will report as it's ip address.

It depends. The cable modem is generally at best a bridge, not a router.
It doesn't do address translation. At least with Time Warner and Cablevision.. haven't used any others. If you buy straightforward cable modem service, your computer will do a DHCP request and get an IP lease direct from the provider.. and the cable modem will not have any IP address at all. If you either provide your own router in-between your computer(s) and your cable modem, then it will do the DHCP request to the provider and get assigned the IP address.. and then it will assign non-routable addresses to your computers.
The same is true if you pay extra to the cable company for a combination router/modem. Time Warner wants $50/installation + $5/month for WAP/router.. which is way more than you would pay buying one yourself.. so it makes no sense to get it from them. What you do is get a simple cable modem.. then after the installer leaves, you clone your computer MAC address into the external interface of the router.. because they will lock your IP address to your MAC address.. so that you cannot simply change your IP to some random one and mess with other subscribers on the network.

[#] Tue Feb 17 2009 17:34:49 EST from LoanShark @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

address to your MAC address.. so that you cannot simply change your IP

to some random one and mess with other subscribers on the network.

They do that? That's really evil. Cablevision doesn't do that (although to get a device with a different MAC address to work, you have to power cycle the cable modem.)

What if you buy a new computer? You have to pay to have an installer come back out? That's ridiculous. you should be able to just pick up the phone (which is still evil)

[#] Tue Feb 17 2009 17:51:49 EST from rod @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

It's not really a modem anyway (since it doesn't modulate/demodulate) it's actually just a network adapter. (semantics, I know.)
Anyway, the cable "modem" has it's own MAC - the ISP often uses this to supply service - during provisioning the ISP will add the MAC address to the allowed list of adapters. However, IP addresses are passed out to the device that you attach to the ISP's adapter. If I want a new IP address, I just change my router's MAC address and - viola! new IP. (You may have to power cycle or soft reboot the router.)
The majority of cable modems have an IP address of 192.168.100.1; punching this number into a web browser often shows diagnostic pages. Don't get any ideas though, if your ISP finds you hacking your modem, they'll kick you off or maybe even try to have you arrested.
Conversly, most home routers are 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.0.1; good to know if you ever need to change your config... or someone elses...

[#] Tue Feb 17 2009 17:55:33 EST from LoanShark @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]


If you ran your network adapter in promisc mode while connected to, I think, the old LanCity cable modems (pre-DOCSIS), you could see the modem sending out a BOOTP request, I think. You could watch this traffic to figure out your modem's IP, but I never bothered to see if it was hosting any diag pages...

[#] Tue Feb 17 2009 19:43:45 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

I'm sure the MAC address binding expires out of their system after a period of inactivity. I know that with Acecape DSL, there's a MAC address lock, but you can unlock it using their web portal or a phone call to the NOC if you're changing around your equipment.

[#] Tue Feb 17 2009 20:40:04 EST from rod @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

POPPYCOCK I TELL YOU!!! POPPYCOCK!!
I generally have no idea what I'm talking about; talk of of my posts with a grain of salt.

[#] Wed Feb 18 2009 07:40:22 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

http://labs.mozilla.com/2009/02/introducing-bespin/

 

finaly a mozilla editor!

(remembers to sort of the quake tc's where one was with race cars)



[#] Wed Feb 18 2009 09:44:47 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Not interested in editing source code using anything other than vi ... but I like the color scheme. May have to steal that.

[#] Wed Feb 18 2009 11:11:16 EST from rod @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

I couldn't find a deb, exe, or even the source that was easy to build. Am I missing something? They certainly don't make it easy.
Oh, and I'm not signing up for anything, do I have to do that to get the software?

[#] Wed Feb 18 2009 14:39:49 EST from Harbard @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

vi?!?  You a heretic. The one and only true editor is EMACS!



[#] Wed Feb 18 2009 14:41:03 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]


*twich*

[#] Wed Feb 18 2009 15:08:34 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

meca loves emacs.

Mi Feb 18 2009 20:39:49 CET von Harbard <>

vi?!?  You a heretic. The one and only true editor is EMACS!





[#] Wed Feb 18 2009 17:05:30 EST from wizard of aahz @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Oh godz.. I'd rather discuss religion.. (Yes I know EMACS and vi is a religious discussion but still.. Let's talk politics instead)

[#] Wed Feb 18 2009 19:25:51 EST from Peter Pulse @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]


They do that? That's really evil. Cablevision doesn't do that
(although to get a device with a different MAC address to work, you
have to power cycle the cable modem.)


Hmm, maybe I didn't power cycle the modem... I'll have to try that some time.

[#] Thu Feb 19 2009 12:08:35 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]


vi is the One True Editor! All else is inferior!

[#] Fri Feb 20 2009 10:17:59 EST from Dirk Stanley @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

So, again, for a dummy :

1. What if you *want* to change your IP address (e.g. you played WOW and someone to annoy you starts to PING your IP address repeatedly?)
2. What if you *don't want* to change your IP address (e.g. that OpenDNS sounds interesting, but can you ask Comcast to leave it alone?)

Probably the average user doesn't think of these things, so Comcast doesn't deal with this a lot, but I'm looking at a secure gateway into our hospital so I'm trying to figure out how to navigate these issues...

Is there a good book I should be reading about this?

[#] Fri Feb 20 2009 10:36:50 EST from Peter Pulse @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

If you -don't- want to change your IP.. well, it is up to them. Once your lease expires, it is altogether possible that your IP will be assigned to someone else. So you cannot simply refuse to use DHCP. On the other hand, I suspect that your IP will never change so long as you continue renewing the lease, at least, it is unlikely (unless their DHCP server goes down, then I dunno what will happen). So you can usually count on your address staying the same for a very long time so long as your DHCP client (eg router) remains up continuously. If you are just running a personal service, that might be good enough. But if you want an IP that you can really count on never changing, I know at least some cable co's offer business class service with a fixed IP and with explicit permission to run servers, handle your own email etc.
As far as the situation where you WANT your ip to change, I am pretty sure you can find some way to force it, for example if you send a DHCP release, wait a bit, then send a DHCP discover.. then if they are truly doing dynamic IP you will probably be offered a different address. But the only way to know is to try, since the providers DHCP server is completely in control of that behavior

[#] Fri Feb 20 2009 10:44:16 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

With most cable companies you'll probably keep the same IP address as long as your router keeps renewing ... which would be the case until either you or them has an outage.

Verizon, on the other hand, is notorious for gratuitously changing your IP address. I've heard reports of it happening for no good reason sometimes as often as every eight hours.

[#] Sat Feb 21 2009 01:17:25 EST from Nite*Star @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

The majority of cable modems have an IP address of 192.168.100.1;
punching this number into a web browser often shows diagnostic pages.


I did this and found the following information under the "addresses" tab:

The SURFboard cable modem can be used as a gateway to the Internet by a maximum of 32 users on a Local Area Network (LAN). When the Cable Modem is disconnected from the Internet, users on the LAN can be dynamically assigned IP Addresses by the Cable Modem DHCP Server. These addresses are assigned from an address pool which begins with 192.168.100.11 and ends with 192.168.100.42. Statically assigned IP addresses for other devices on the LAN should be chosen from outside of this range

[#] Sat Feb 21 2009 01:41:47 EST from Nite*Star @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Cablevision offers a super-duper-Internet service called Optimum Boost. For $15/month extra (or $10/month if you're subscribed to their Triple Play package and have signed up for their Optimum Rewards program), you get double the speeds (so 30mbps down and 15mbps up), a static IP, unblocked ports (so you can use a SMTP server other than optonline.net), and a few other nifty features thrown in.

They also offer business-class Internet/VOIP for $30/month each for the 1st year, which comes with static IP, as well...

Go to page: First ... 25 26 27 28 [29] 30 31 32 33 ... Last