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[#] Wed Jan 14 2009 16:29:08 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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It'll be a return to the days of bad sector maps!

[#] Wed Jan 14 2009 17:44:01 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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Or you can do what I did ... just plug in a USB to serial adapter.

yeah, I just found this:
http://www.linux-usb.org/USB-guide/x356.html

I had no idea. Golden.

[#] Wed Jan 14 2009 17:46:17 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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Jan 14 2009 4:29pm from IGnatius T Foobar @uncnsrd
It'll be a return to the days of bad sector maps!



Don't they basically do that on CD's?
Or rather, there's so much error correcting data that they're not marking bad blocks but effectivly marking bad data.
so if everything goes that way...

Your disk will get smaller and smaller over time but will keep working.

[#] Wed Jan 14 2009 21:28:54 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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yeah, I just found this:
http://www.linux-usb.org/USB-guide/x356.html

Bingo. Except you don't actually have to do all of that insmod and mknod nonsense. All modern Linux systems are running udev, so you basically just plug the thing in and /dev/ttyUSB0 suddenly appears.

[#] Wed Jan 14 2009 21:32:06 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Your disk will get smaller and smaller over time but will keep
working.

Modern hard disk drives still do actually have bad sectors, but the activity of mapping them out to spare sectors is handled by the drive's firmware now.
On a drive that's about to quit, it'll fill up the spares and then start throwing hard errors when the spares are all used up.

SMART can predict drive failures with startling accuracy by monitoring this activity. In fact, if you 've got a decent drive and you're running smartd (or whatever the equivalent is on other operating systems), the system can in most cases tell you when a drive is going to fail in the next 24 hours.

[#] Wed Jan 14 2009 21:34:48 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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and you better hope to hell you're not on vacation.

[#] Wed Jan 14 2009 21:36:37 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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of all the stupid and useless packages that get installed by default, smarttoolmon does not?

[#] Wed Jan 14 2009 22:08:52 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Sure, if you're running JBOD and the machine is in your house, then yeah, you're out of luck. But in a data center with thousands of disk drives, a monitoring system, and a NOC staff ... totally different ball game. In fact, many high-end storage systems will bring a hot spare online *before* the drive actually quits. Meanwhile it's notifying someone that a drive replacement is required.

If you've got real high class stuff, a field service engineer and a replacement drive are already en route by the time you find out your machine threw a disk.

[#] Thu Jan 15 2009 17:26:48 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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I can't see a situation where you wouldn't want to be notified about a disk failing, why wouldn't they install that by defult.
If you're in a big shop running linux, with a pile of disks, you'd know to turn it off.

[#] Thu Jan 15 2009 17:56:09 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Actually, if you're in a big shop running Linux, you're probably not running JBOD or even software RAID; you're probably running hardware RAID, in which case this stuff is all managed by your RAID controller. smartmontools can't see disks on the other side of a RAID controller; all it will see is the virtual disk exposed by the controller. In that case you're not going to be running smartmontools; you'll be running whatever management program is specific to that RAID controller.

For example, on a Dell server, you install OpenManage, and tie its alerts into your monitoring system, and call it a day.

[#] Fri Jan 16 2009 13:00:31 EST from Nite*Star @ Uncensored

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Don't they basically do that on CD's?
Or rather, there's so much error correcting data that they're not

marking bad blocks but effectivly marking bad data.
so if everything goes that way...

I just did a whole lotta reading on CDs and error correction. It all depends on which "mode" you're using to write the data. Mode 2 form 1 basically decreases (by a significant amount) the amount of data you can store on a disc b/c it includes so much error-correction. Mode 2 form 1 was created for data storage.


Mode 2 form 2 doesn't write out all of that error correction and was developed for multi-media, which is much more tolerant of data errors.



Check out this thread for a better explanation: http://tinyurl.com/ayawul

[#] Sun Jan 18 2009 00:38:26 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Knock Knock.... IBM here, your Shark tryed to byte off more then it could

chew.....

We're finally getting rid of our Shark, possibly as soon as this week. It will be the end of an era.

[#] Wed Jan 21 2009 12:35:39 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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I just noticed a popup in my desktop notification area that said I received a new email message. These popups now include the first few words of the message, so you might be able to glance at the popup and know whether the message is important enough to switch back over to your email client and read it.

The text of the message began: "WWVzLCBoYXZlIGFib3V0IDRQTS4gDQotLS0tLU9yaWdpbmF..."

The message itself simply read "Yes, have about 4PM." I looked at the message source and sure enough ... Base64.

It seems that Blackberry now sends *everything* encoded in Base64. Even plain text is in Base64. So that makes it official: email software which doesn't support all of the MIME extensions is now one hundred percent unusable.

This is the kind of thing that Ford likes to refer to as "progress."

[#] Wed Jan 21 2009 12:37:25 EST from LoanShark @ Uncensored

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We're finally getting rid of our Shark, possibly as soon as this week.


Nooooooooo!

[#] Wed Jan 21 2009 13:27:35 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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If you need a friend, we can arrange to have it shipped to your home.

[#] Thu Jan 22 2009 19:44:59 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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I need to make an ISO image out of a CD. I'm missing the obvious tool required to do this, help?

[#] Thu Jan 22 2009 21:21:46 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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I used dd, is that right?

[#] Thu Jan 22 2009 21:59:56 EST from Animal @ Uncensored

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windows? LC ISO Creator. Freeware.
http://www.lucersoft.com/freeware.php

[#] Thu Jan 22 2009 23:53:03 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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If he used dd then he isn't on Windows. :)

And yes, since an .iso file is really just a raw image of the disc, you can use dd to create them.

dd if=/dev/cdrom of=hifromstu.iso

[#] Fri Jan 23 2009 07:44:07 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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cool, thanks, speaking of, why does ubuntu mount the cd under /media?
Why do they have to be different, they're not helping. I always have trouble finding my CDs.

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