Language:
switch to room list switch to menu My folders
Go to page: First ... 11 12 13 14 [15] 16 17 18 19 ... Last
[#] Fri Oct 16 2009 16:58:17 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

There's no more ibm room. Oh well.

So anyway, something actually kinda cool happened.
I was away for the weekend over columbus day weekend in the boonies, but the log cabin we stayed in had a really slow, but working internet connection.
At some point I wanted to listen to a particular pantera song, but I was dismayed to find I had not loaded it on my phone (my main mp3 player)
So I figured I was out of luck, because there was no way to get the mp3 on the phone even if I could get it.
BUT! I had my laptop and my laptop has an IR port.
Well sure enough, after a little torrenting around I found the song, and was able to transfer it via IR to my phone. IT took a long time, but it worked and I didn't have to install any software on the phone or the XP machine. It was all there. I put the phone up to the laptop and it said "ohh! There's a computer nearby. I clicked the little icon and it said "what files do you want to send via IR" I picked my mp3, and 15 or so minutes later, there it was on my phone. The mp3 player software asked me "where do you want to put this, on the phone or the card" and then happily did it.
Things like this never work out this well.

There's a little defunt department at microsoft I'd like to thank for that happy little moment.

[#] Sun Oct 18 2009 09:10:52 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Imagine that. IrDA never really did get its 15 minutes of fame ... wifi made it obsolete a lot sooner than anyone thought.

Come to think of it, doesn't your phone have wifi?

[#] Mon Oct 19 2009 13:41:46 EDT from Peter Pulse @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

I was amazed to find, when by whim I tried it.. that I could install applications on my Treo by bluetooth file transfer.. without any extra software being installed.
Just transfer a .prc file to the phone and it asks you if you want to install it.

[#] Mon Oct 19 2009 16:49:31 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Come to think of it, doesn't your phone have wifi?

Sadly no. I had a external gizmo formy 650, but when my 650 died, it didn't work with my new 680.
So no wifi, which is too bad.
Friend of mine has a blackberry. We were away on holiday in PA somewhere, and there was no signal, but his phone picked up the wifi we setup and he was able to make calls and browse innernet and all that.
Built in to the phone.
Now THAT's the way it should be, and only blackberry does it.
Not even the almighty iPieceOfShit.

[#] Mon Oct 19 2009 16:50:31 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

yeah, the treo seems to have a registry of extensions somewhere. when I sent it a .mp3 the ptunes program asked me if I wanted to save the mp3 or save and play it. So the OS knows to run the program when it gets a new file, however it gets it guess.

[#] Tue Oct 20 2009 00:19:44 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Friend of mine has a blackberry. We were away on holiday in PA
somewhere, and there was no signal, but his phone picked up the wifi we

setup and he was able to make calls and browse innernet and all that.


"wifi is the new dialtone"

(you heard it here first)

[#] Tue Oct 20 2009 01:08:43 EDT from Peter Pulse @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

What's a dialtone??

[#] Tue Oct 20 2009 06:08:42 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

It's the sound some people make when they shower with Dial soap.



[#] Tue Oct 20 2009 10:22:58 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Landlines may be in decline, but one of its two replacements still uses a dial tone. Wireless doesn't, but VoIP does.

One of the nice things about IP phones has been that we're now entering an era where people readily accept the idea that you have to tell the phone that you've finished dialing.

[#] Tue Oct 20 2009 12:10:09 EDT from skpacman @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

yeah, i've noticed that trend. My home phone (VoIP) has to do that, i have to hit * at the end of dialing or it just hangs and get an automated message saying "Sorry, we could not understand what you were requesting. Please hang up and dial again. When you're finished dialing press * or # to continue."  it goes on about how to automatically set it so it doesnt need * or # but i like that feature.. it stops my son from calling canada on accident   0.o



[#] Tue Oct 20 2009 14:00:57 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

One of the nice things about IP phones has been that we're now
entering an era where people readily accept the idea that you have to

tell the phone that you've finished dialing.

I see the technical advantagein that (and I guess an ease-of-use one as well in that you can cancel or backspace if you made mistake) but from a user interface perspective, it's kind of a step back.
The machine should know when I'm done dialling.

[#] Wed Oct 21 2009 10:43:19 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

We've been there before, but unfortunately we've reached a point where the expected length of the phone number cannot be determined by looking at the first few digits.

The NANPA scheme used to dictate that if the second digit was a 1 or 0, the user was dialing an area code (NPA), so the number could be expected to be ten digits long; otherwise it was a prefix (NXX) and the number could be expected to be seven digits long. Not so anymore. We ran out of area codes, and most area codes ran out of prefixes, so NPA/NXX could be any combination of digits.

For a while, we had the "dial 1 for long distance" thing, but in some places you still had to dial 1 to go out of area even if you were in the same area code.

Not trying to predict the length of the number has other advantages, too.
For example, when I build the dial plan for an IP Phone system, I can expect to see the entire number at once. This eliminates the need to do silly things like "dial 9 for an outside line." If the user dials three or four digits, it's an in-house call; if the user dials seven or ten digits, it's an outside call.

It's funny that IP phones and wireless phones still make the touch tone sounds when you're dialing. The tones don't get used for anything.

[#] Wed Oct 21 2009 10:46:56 EDT from skpacman @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

 

Wed Oct 21 2009 10:43:19 AM EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

It's funny that IP phones and wireless phones still make the touch tone sounds when you're dialing. The tones don't get used for anything.


unless you're calling customer service of some kind that is not your data provider. they still use tone recognition for their menu options. (or, at least most of mine do)



[#] Wed Oct 21 2009 12:33:24 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Naturally, there are plenty of IVR's that use touch tone for navigation (and frankly, I *hate* the ones that make you talk to them). But the VoIP and Wireless phone networks themselves do not use touch tone for dialing. It's just a comfort thing. ("Comfort noise" is, too, of course.)

[#] Wed Oct 21 2009 15:57:30 EDT from skpacman @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

 

Wed Oct 21 2009 12:33:24 PM EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored
(and frankly, I *hate* the ones that make you talk to them).

Microsoft's Operating System Phone Registration Hotline is voice based commands only. You end up hearing "Did you mean _________?" and end up saying "Go Back" about a thousand times in one call just to get ONE computer registered over the phone...



[#] Thu Oct 22 2009 09:28:06 EDT from Dirk Stanley @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

I'm sorry, I know I'm late to the discussion, but does anyone know - Are we running out of regular telephone numbers?

(I always wondered what Google Voice did to this...)

[#] Thu Oct 22 2009 15:08:30 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

We've been there before, but unfortunately we've reached a point where

the expected length of the phone number cannot be determined by looking

at the first few digits.

Playing the apple product user's perspective, that is a technical design failing, there's no reason I should have to tell the machine when I'm done dialling. The fact that the number assignment scheme is limiting is a fault of the designers not the numbers themselves.

And we all know apple users wants whats best. And what jobs says is what's best, and I bet he doesn't like having to tell the phone when he's done dialling.

[#] Thu Oct 22 2009 15:09:42 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

(and frankly, I *hate* the ones that make you talk to them). But the


yes, but that convienently gets them out of HAVING to have an operator for rotary phones. I imagine there was quite party somewhere when they worked that out.

[#] Thu Oct 22 2009 15:11:03 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

actually I imagine all the ip phone givaway companies are causing more of a problem.
I expect they set themselves up in nebraska because that's where there's lots of unused numbers in the area code.

[#] Thu Oct 22 2009 22:56:59 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

You used to work for a phone company ... surely you're familiar with a practice known as "traffic pumping"?

Go to page: First ... 11 12 13 14 [15] 16 17 18 19 ... Last