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[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 10:33:00 EDT from rss

Subject: Europe's Biggest Amateur Rocket Completes Test-Firing

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Michael Eriksen writes "The Danish amateur rocket group Copenhagen Suborbitals has successfully test fired their rocket (article in Danish). It is a 90,000 kW monster delivering a total of 140,000 N. According to the group, this is by far the biggest amateur rocket ever fired in Europe. The final goal is a manned (!) low-orbital flight."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/wHABlgqNoZA/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 13:39:00 EDT from rss

Subject: Adobe's ADEPT DRM Broken

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An anonymous reader writes "I love cabbages has reverse-engineered Adobe's ADEPT DRM (e-book protection). On February 18, I love cabbages released code that decrypts EPUB e-books protected with ADEPT and followed that up on February 25, with code that decrypts PDF e-books protected with ADEPT. On March 4, I love cabbages was given a DMCA take down notice. And there's plenty of evidence he got it right. DS:TNG (Dmitry Sklyarov: The Next Generation)?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/MwN1JcIUu-w/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 14:19:00 EDT from rss

Subject: Packing Algorithms May Save the Planet

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An anonymous reader writes "New Scientist reports on how competitions to devise better packing algorithms could help cut the environmental impact of deliveries and shipping. A new record setter at packing differently-sized discs into the smallest space without overlapping them has potential to be applied to real world 3D problems, researchers claim." Ok the title might be a little ridiculous, but the ridiculous packaging used to ship a few tiny objects by some shippers is pretty shameful.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/eXFGFDRVugc/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 15:01:00 EDT from rss

Subject: Intel Envisions Shape-Shifting Smartphones

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

An anonymous reader writes "It's not sci-fi, but rather advanced robotics research which is leading Intel to envision shape-shifting smartphones. 'Imagine what you would do with this material,' says Jason Campbell, a senior researcher at Intel's Pittsburgh Lab who's working in collaboration with Carnegie Mellon University. 'If you want to carry the device, you'd make it as small as possible by making it pack itself as densely as possible. When you go to surf the Web, you're going to make it big.' The material being studied is transparent silicon-dioxide hemispheres, which can roll around each other under electrical control to create different shapes. The lab has built 6-inch long actuators, which it's working to reduce to 1-mm tube-sized prototypes. When will we see a shape-shifting phone? 'In terms of me being able to buy it, that's a difficult forecasting problem, because I have to guess about manufacturing costs,' Campbell said. 'I won't do that. But we hope the science will be proved out in three to five years.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/a-gro7QLrV4/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 15:46:00 EDT from rss

Subject: US Forgets How To Make Trident Missiles

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Hugh Pickens writes "The US and the UK are trying to refurbish the aging W76 warheads that tip Trident missiles to prolong their life and ensure they are safe and reliable but plans have been put on hold because US scientists have forgotten how to manufacture a a mysterious but very hazardous component of the warhead codenamed Fogbank. "NNSA had lost knowledge of how to manufacture the material because it had kept few records of the process when the material was made in the 1980s, and almost all staff with expertise on production had retired or left the agency," says the report by a US congressional committee. Fogbank is thought by some weapons experts to be a foam used between the fission and fusion stages of the thermonuclear bomb on the Trident Missile and US officials say that manufacturing Fogbank requires a solvent cleaning agent which is "extremely flammable" and "explosive" and that the process involves dealing with "toxic materials" hazardous to workers. "This is like James Bond destroying his instructions as soon as he has read them," says John Ainslie, the co-ordinator of the Scottish Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament adding that "perhaps the plans for making Fogbank were so secret that no copies were kept." Thomas D'Agostino, administrator or the US National Nuclear Security Administration, told a congressional committee that the administration was spending "a lot of money" trying to make "Fogbank" at Y-12, but "we're not out of the woods yet"."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/wZHyDBQghJs/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 16:40:00 EDT from rss

Subject: Quick Boot Linux Hopes To Win Over Windows Users

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Al writes "A company called Presto hopes to exploit the painful amount of time it takes for Windows computers to start up by offering a streamlined version of Linux that boots in just a seconds. Presto's distro comes with Firefox, Skype and other goodies pre-installed and the company has also created an app store so that users can install only what they really need. The software was demonstrated at this years's Demo conference in Palm Desert, CA. Interestingly, the company barely mentions the name Linux on its website. Is this a clever stealth-marketing ploy for converting Windows users to Linux?" Link To Original Source

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/nr3ipmJKrg8/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 17:23:00 EDT from rss

Subject: New Ice Structure Could Help Seed Clouds, Cause Rain

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

ScienceDaily is reporting that a new ice chain structure may provide a better method for seeding clouds and causing rain. "Ice structures are usually built out of simple hexagonal arrangements of water molecules and this hexagonal building block motif is easily observed in the structures of snowflakes. However, during their studies Dr Angelos Michaelides and co-workers from the Fritz Haber Institute, Berlin, and the University of Liverpool have discovered a natural nanoscale ice structure formed of pentagons."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/4OGKO9Swlbs/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 18:11:00 EDT from rss

Subject: The Shadow Factory

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

brothke writes "The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America is the third of James Bamford's trilogy. Bamford started this with The Puzzle Palace in 1982 and Body of Secrets: Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency in 2001. The Shadow Factory is likely the last book Bamford will find the NSA cooperative to, given his often harsh treatment of the agency and its directors. It is also doubtful that former NSA Director Lt. Gen. Michael Hayden will grant Bamford additional dinner invitations, given his portrayal of Hayden as a weakling who could not stand up to Dick Cheney and other in the Bush administration." Read below for the rest of Ben's review.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/W-3adOKHx2w/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 19:04:00 EDT from rss

Subject: Self-Encrypting Hard Drives and the New Security

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

In a recent blog post, CNet's Jon Oitsik has called for a policy shift with respect to data encryption. A new standard by the Trusted Computing Group promises the availability of self-encrypting hard drives soon, and leading some to call for the immediate adoption. Will this create even more security problems due to lazy custodians, or should someone responsible for keeping your information safe be required to move to the new hardware? Hopefully the new hardware comes with a warning to continue to use other data protection measures as well.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/_zAKrTD0dgI/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 19:48:00 EDT from rss

Subject: New Zealand's Recording Industry CEO Tries to Defend New Draconian Law

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An anonymous reader writes "Campbell Smith, CEO of the RIAA equivalent in New Zealand has written an opinion piece for one of New Zealand's largest daily papers where he tries to justify the new "presumed guilty" copyright law. This law allows recording industry members to watch file sharing activity and notify ISPs of users who are downloading material. The copyright holder can then demand that an ISP disconnects that user — without the user ever having a chance to demonstrate their evidence."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/PuXLSnkJXOM/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 20:32:00 EDT from rss

Subject: AMD RV790 Architecture To Change GPGPU Landscape?

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Vigile writes "To many observers, the success of the GPGPU landscape has really been pushed by NVIDIA and its line of Tesla and Quadro GPUs. While ATI was the first to offer support for consumer applications like Folding@Home, NVIDIA has since taken command of the market with its CUDA architecture and programs like Badaboom and others for the HPC world. PC Perspective has speculation that points to ATI addressing the shortcomings of its lineup with a revised GPU known as RV790 that would both dramatically increase gaming performance as well as more than triple the compute power on double precision floating point operations — one of the keys to HPC acceptance."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/7Z9HFQXJLBw/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 21:15:00 EDT from rss

Subject: ISS To Become Second Brightest Object In the Sky

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Matt_dk writes "Move over, Morning Star. Once Canadarm2 helps install the fourth and final set of solar array wings to the International Space Station later this month, the Station will surpass Venus as the brightest object in the night sky, second only to the Moon. The Space Shuttle Discovery is set to deliver the power-generating solar panels and Starboard 6 (S6) truss segment to the ISS on the 125th mission in the Shuttle program, known as STS-119/15A (slated for launch on March 11)"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org:80/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/gh2hU3M3BFE/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 20:32:00 EDT from rss

Subject: AMD RV790 Architecture To Change GPGPU Landscape?

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Vigile writes "To many observers, the success of the GPGPU landscape has really been pushed by NVIDIA and its line of Tesla and Quadro GPUs. While ATI was the first to offer support for consumer applications like Folding@Home, NVIDIA has since taken command of the market with its CUDA architecture and programs like Badaboom and others for the HPC world. PC Perspective has speculation that points to ATI addressing the shortcomings of its lineup with a revised GPU known as RV790 that would both dramatically increase gaming performance as well as more than triple the compute power on double precision floating point operations — one of the keys to HPC acceptance."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org:80/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/7Z9HFQXJLBw/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 19:48:00 EDT from rss

Subject: New Zealand's Recording Industry CEO Tries to Defend New Draconian Law

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

An anonymous reader writes "Campbell Smith, CEO of the RIAA equivalent in New Zealand, has written an opinion piece for one of New Zealand's largest daily papers, in which he tries to justify the new 'presumed guilty' copyright law. This law allows recording industry members to watch file-sharing activity and notify ISPs of users who are downloading material. The copyright holder can then demand that an ISP disconnect that user — without the user ever having a chance to demonstrate their evidence."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org:80/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/PuXLSnkJXOM/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 19:04:00 EDT from rss

Subject: Self-Encrypting Hard Drives and the New Security

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

In a recent blog post, CNet's Jon Oitsik has called for a policy shift with respect to data encryption. A new standard by the Trusted Computing Group promises the availability of self-encrypting hard drives soon, leading some to call for immediate adoption. Will this create even more security problems due to lazy custodians, or should someone responsible for keeping your information safe be required to move to the new hardware? Hopefully the new hardware comes with a warning to continue to use other data protection measures as well.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org:80/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/_zAKrTD0dgI/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 18:11:00 EDT from rss

Subject: The Shadow Factory

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

brothke writes "The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America is the third of James Bamford's trilogy. Bamford started this with The Puzzle Palace in 1982 and Body of Secrets: Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency in 2001. The Shadow Factory is likely the last book Bamford will find the NSA cooperative to, given his often harsh treatment of the agency and its directors. It is also doubtful that former NSA Director Lt. Gen. Michael Hayden will grant Bamford additional dinner invitations, given his portrayal of Hayden as a weakling who could not stand up to Dick Cheney and other in the Bush administration." Read below for the rest of Ben's review.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org:80/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/W-3adOKHx2w/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 17:23:00 EDT from rss

Subject: New Ice Structure Could Help Seed Clouds, Cause Rain

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

ScienceDaily is reporting that a new ice chain structure may provide a better method for seeding clouds and causing rain. "Ice structures are usually built out of simple hexagonal arrangements of water molecules and this hexagonal building block motif is easily observed in the structures of snowflakes. However, during their studies Dr Angelos Michaelides and co-workers from the Fritz Haber Institute, Berlin, and the University of Liverpool have discovered a natural nanoscale ice structure formed of pentagons."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org:80/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/4OGKO9Swlbs/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 16:40:00 EDT from rss

Subject: Quick Boot Linux Hopes To Win Over Windows Users

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Al writes "A company called Presto hopes to exploit the painful amount of time it takes for Windows computers to start up by offering a streamlined version of Linux that boots in just seconds. Presto's distro comes with Firefox, Skype and other goodies pre-installed and the company has also created an app store so that users can install only what they really need. The software was demonstrated at this year's Demo conference in Palm Desert, CA. Interestingly, the company barely mentions the name Linux on its website. Is this a clever stealth-marketing ploy for converting Windows users to Linux?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org:80/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/nr3ipmJKrg8/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 15:46:00 EDT from rss

Subject: US Forgets How To Make Trident Missiles

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Hugh Pickens writes "The US and the UK are trying to refurbish the aging W76 warheads that tip Trident missiles to prolong their life and ensure they are safe and reliable but plans have been put on hold because US scientists have forgotten how to manufacture a mysterious but very hazardous component of the warhead codenamed Fogbank. 'NNSA had lost knowledge of how to manufacture the material because it had kept few records of the process when the material was made in the 1980s, and almost all staff with expertise on production had retired or left the agency,' says the report by a US congressional committee. Fogbank is thought by some weapons experts to be a foam used between the fission and fusion stages of the thermonuclear bomb on the Trident Missile and US officials say that manufacturing Fogbank requires a solvent cleaning agent which is 'extremely flammable' and 'explosive,' and that the process involves dealing with 'toxic materials' hazardous to workers. 'This is like James Bond destroying his instructions as soon as he has read them,' says John Ainslie, the co-ordinator of the Scottish Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, adding that 'perhaps the plans for making Fogbank were so secret that no copies were kept.' Thomas D'Agostino, administrator or the US National Nuclear Security Administration, told a congressional committee that the administration was spending 'a lot of money' trying to make 'Fogbank' at Y-12, but 'we're not out of the woods yet.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org:80/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/wZHyDBQghJs/article.pl

[#] Mon Mar 09 2009 15:01:00 EDT from rss

Subject: Intel Envisions Shape-Shifting Smartphones

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

An anonymous reader writes "It's not sci-fi, but rather advanced robotics research which is leading Intel to envision shape-shifting smartphones. 'Imagine what you would do with this material,' says Jason Campbell, a senior researcher at Intel's Pittsburgh Lab who's working in collaboration with Carnegie Mellon University. 'If you want to carry the device, you'd make it as small as possible by making it pack itself as densely as possible. When you go to surf the Web, you're going to make it big.' The material being studied is transparent silicon-dioxide hemispheres, which can roll around each other under electrical control to create different shapes. The lab has built 6-inch long actuators, which it's working to reduce to 1-mm tube-sized prototypes. When will we see a shape-shifting phone? 'In terms of me being able to buy it, that's a difficult forecasting problem, because I have to guess about manufacturing costs,' Campbell said. 'I won't do that. But we hope the science will be proved out in three to five years.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org:80/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/a-gro7QLrV4/article.pl

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