Language:
switch to room list switch to menu My folders
Go to page: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 ... Last
[#] Mon Feb 09 2009 11:52:00 EST from rss

Subject: Scientists Reconstruct Millennium's Coldest Winter

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Ponca City, We love you writes "In England they called it the Great Frost, while in France it entered legend as Le Grand Hiver, three months of deadly cold that fell over Europe in 1709 ushering in a year of famine and food riots. Livestock died from cold in their barns, chicken's combs froze and fell off, trees exploded and travelers froze to death on the roads. It was the coldest winter in 500 years with temperatures as much as 7 degrees C below the average for 20th-century Europe. Now as part of the European Union's Millennium Project, Scientists are aiming to reconstruct the past 1000 years of Europe's climate using a combination of direct measurements, proxy indicators of temperature such as tree rings and ice cores, and data gleaned from historical documents."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org:80/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/0jsOQSNUrmE/article.pl

[#] Mon Feb 09 2009 23:25:00 EST from rss

Subject: Is Google Silently Removing Posts?

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

mrbill writes to tell us that several music bloggers believe that Google may be silently removing posts. Those especially prone to conspiracy theories think this may be a part of some greater nefarious action in cooperation with the RIAA. The LA Weekly story cites several sites and email/chat room discussion that points to the only common ground being Google's Blogger platform for sites that have had content mysteriously disappear. This still resides firmly in the wildly speculative realm of unfounded rumor but raises the question, should Google be required to notify a content creator when their IP has been deleted/removed?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/wd1PGE-mf7s/article.pl

[#] Tue Feb 10 2009 00:13:00 EST from rss

Subject: Microsoft Agrees To License ActiveSync To Google

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

JacobSteelsmith writes "Microsoft agreed today to license ActiveSync to Google. Google is using ActiveSync as part of Google Sync, which enables the synchronization of data between mobile devices and, presumably, Google Calendar and your contacts stored at Google. 'Microsoft's vice president of intellectual property and licensing, Horacio Gutierrez, said in a statement that the Google license is "a great example of Microsoft's openness to generally license our patents under fair and reasonable terms so long as licensees respect Microsoft intellectual property."'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/yxCr_EBE8cQ/article.pl

[#] Tue Feb 10 2009 00:57:00 EST from rss

Subject: Metasploit Hacking Tool To Get Services-Based Model

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

ancientribe writes "Metasploit hacking tool creator HD Moore told Dark Reading that the open-source hacking tool soon will come with back-end services-based features aimed at offloading resource-intensive penetration testing tasks. This is a departure for the software-oriented Metasploit, and Moore and company just may be on to something: it turns out commercial penetration testing tool vendors are looking at adding services-based versions of their software. Immunity Inc. will do so this year, and Core Security Technologies is considering doing so as well."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/GomI6p7qVMc/article.pl

[#] Tue Feb 10 2009 02:34:00 EST from rss

Subject: FTC Kills Dirty Online Check Processing Outfit

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

coondoggie writes "The Federal Trade Commission today got a US District Court to stop permanently what it called the illegal operations of an Internet-based check creation and delivery service, and to require the group to give up over half a million dollars in ill-gotten gains. According to the FTC, Qchex.com created and sent checks drawn on any bank account that a Qchex user identified, but did not verify whether the user had authority to draw checks on that account. As a result, fraudsters worldwide used the Qchex service to draw thousands of checks on bank accounts that belonged to unwitting third parties. 'The evidence shows that the launch of Qchex.com was a "dinner bell" for fraudsters and resulted in a high number of accounts frozen for fraud...' said District Court Judge Janis Sammartino."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/Xd2MnM0v3-I/article.pl

[#] Tue Feb 10 2009 04:25:00 EST from rss

Subject: Hackable Microcontroller-Powered Valentine's Card

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

compumike writes "If you have a significant other to impress this Valentine's Day, consider putting your programming skills to use. This video tutorial shows how to build an LED Heart Valentine's card, powered by a microcontroller running C code, with a neat randomized 'twinkling' effect in an interrupt handler. Think about it: how many ladies can say that their Valentine's card runs at 14 MHz?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/EJ11fCXJQZE/article.pl

[#] Tue Feb 10 2009 04:08:00 EST from rss

Subject: Slashdot.org Self-Slashdotted

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Slashdot.org was unreachable for about 75 minutes this evening. Here is the post-mortem from Sourceforge's chief network engineer. "What we had was indeed a DoS, however it was not externally originating. At 8:55 PM EST I received a call saying things were horked, at the same time I had also noticed things were not happy. After fighting with our external management servers to login I finally was able to get in and start looking at traffic. What I saw was a massive amount of traffic going across the core switches; by massive I mean 40 Gbit/sec. After further investigation, I was able to eliminate anything outside our network as the cause, as the incoming ports from Savvis showed very little traffic. So I started poking around on the internal switch ports. While I was doing that I kept having timeouts and problems with the core switches. After looking at the logs on each of the core switches they were complaining about being out of CPU, the error message was actually something to do with multicast. As a precautionary measure I rebooted each core just to make sure it wasn't anything silly. After the cores came back online they instantly went back to 100% fabric CPU usage and started shedding connections again. So slowly I started going through all the switch ports on the cores, trying to isolate where the traffic was originating. The problem was all the cabinet switches were showing 10 Gbit/sec of traffic, making it very hard to isolate. Through the process of elimination I was finally able to isolate the problem down to a pair of switches... After shutting the downlink ports to those switches off, the network recovered and everything came back. I fully believe the switches in that cabinet are still sitting there attempting to send 20Gbit/sec of traffic out trying to do something — I just don't know what yet. Luckily we don't have any machines deployed on [that row in that cabinet] yet so no machines are offline. The network came back up around 10:10 PM EST."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/ypl-5HRlxYk/article.pl

[#] Tue Feb 10 2009 06:28:00 EST from rss

Subject: Website Security Without Breaking the Bank?

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

An anonymous reader writes "I do my own Web design and have a few websites — MySQL, PHP, CSS, HTML, that kind of thing. It's simple, amateur stuff, but I would love to have some reasonable ways to assess their security myself and patch the big holes, or possibly enlist someone to do 'white hat' work to assist me. I have absolutely no idea how to proceed. I don't want to get mired in a never-ending paranoia-fueled race to patch holes before the hackers find them, but on the other hand, I don't want my websites to look like Swiss cheese. Right now, I wouldn't know what kind of cheese they look like: Swiss, Havarti, or hard as Parmesan. How can I take reasonable steps to protect these websites myself? What books has the community found useful? What groups (if any) can offer me inexpensive white-hat hacking that won't end up costing me a first-born child? Or am I better off just waiting until a problem arises and then fixing it?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/GDF3XqtK1UI/article.pl

[#] Tue Feb 10 2009 08:45:00 EST from rss

Subject: Darwinism Must Die So Evolution Can Live

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Pickens writes "MacArthur fellow Carl Safina, an adjunct professor at Stony Brook University, has an interesting essay in the NYTimes that says that equating evolution with Charles Darwin opened the door for creationism by ignoring 150 years of discoveries, including most of what scientists understand about evolution — Gregor Mendel's patterns of heredity, the discovery of DNA, developmental biology, studies documenting evolution in nature, and evolution's role in medicine and disease. Darwinism implies an ideology adhering to one man's dictates, like Marxism, says Safina. He adds that nobody talks about Newtonism or Einsteinism, and that by making Darwin 'into a sacred fetish misses the essence of his teaching.' By turning Darwin into an 'ism,' scientists created the opening for creationism, with the 'isms' implying equivalence. 'By propounding "Darwinism," even scientists and science writers perpetuate an impression that evolution is about one man, one book, one theory,' writes Safina. '"Darwinism" implies that biological scientists "believe in" Darwin's "theory." It's as if, since 1860, scientists have just ditto-headed Darwin rather than challenging and testing his ideas, or adding vast new knowledge.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/e-iKSpNtuY8/article.pl

[#] Mon Feb 09 2009 20:34:00 EST from rss

Subject: The Herschel Telescope Close To Blast Off

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

pha7boy writes "The Herschel space observatory, the European Space Agency's answer to the Hubble Telescope, is about to be sent into orbit. With a mirror 1.5 times the size of the Hubble mirror, the Herschel will look at the universe in the infrared and sub-millimeter range. This 'will permit Herschel to see past the dust that scatters Hubble's visible wavelengths, and to gaze at really cold places and objects in the Universe — from the birthing clouds of new stars to the icy comets that live far out in the Solar System.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/b2QZAn6qJq4/article.pl

[#] Tue Feb 10 2009 10:58:00 EST from rss

Subject: Hadron Collider Relaunch Delayed

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

SpuriousLogic writes "There's been another delay in the schedule announced for getting the Large Hadron Collider switched back on — now it's September 2008, a year after it shut down due to a malfunction. Scientists had said they expected the $5.4B machine to be repaired by November 2007, but then pushed the date back to June 2008, before the latest delay."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/q1cR3F8Ctlk/article.pl

[#] Tue Feb 10 2009 13:15:00 EST from rss

Subject: Putting On a Show For the Google Streetview Camera

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Urban Garlic writes "The community surrounding Samsonia Way in Pittsburgh were ready when the Google StreetView car arrived, and staged a 21st-century public art project. Also celebrated in this Washington Post article, and Kelso's Corner, which also has a collection of public art in StreetView."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/L5YxfitI0N4/article.pl

[#] Tue Feb 10 2009 14:00:00 EST from rss

Subject: Firefox 3.2 Plans Include Natural Language, Themes

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Shrike82 writes "Mozilla have described plans for the next version of their popular web browser, Firefox. Mozilla's "Ubiquity project" is set to become a standard feature, allowing "users to type natural language phrases into the browser to perform certain tasks, such as typing 'map 10 Downing Street' to instantly see a Google map of that address, or 'share-on-delicious' to bookmark the site you're currently visiting on the social news site." Also of interest is so-called "lightweight theming" allowing users to customise the browsers design more easily. The launch date is still somewhat unclear, and Mozilla are apparently unsure if version 3.2 will be released at all, apparently considering going straight to Firefox 4."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/g9Tjh5CfgAs/article.pl

[#] Tue Feb 10 2009 14:43:00 EST from rss

Subject: Shifting Apps to ARM Chips Could Save Laptop Batteries

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

An anonymous reader writes "When is an Intel PC not an Intel PC? When it moves applications such as Internet browsing and email on to an ARM processor because it can get longer battery life. And according to a story at EE Times, this hybrid Intel-ARM processor approach is being taken by PC makers as prominent as Dell. The problem for Intel: Why would you switch out of 'all-day' mode and use the Intel processor? The problem for ARM: lacking support from Microsoft for Windows; the applications it runs for the PC have to do so under Linux."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/KDWeQtdiO3s/article.pl

[#] Tue Feb 10 2009 15:32:00 EST from rss

Subject: Russia's Operating System May Be Fedora Based

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Glyn Moody writes "Last month, a story about Russia producing its own national operating system based on GNU/Linux started circulating. Now there's some confirmation, and details of how the plan might be put into practice. Red Hat had a meeting with the Russian communications ministry, which announced that the development of free software in Russia was one of its priorities. One concrete idea they talked about was using the Russian Fedora project as a step towards creating a national operating system."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/iv5pMfK6whA/article.pl

[#] Tue Feb 10 2009 16:19:00 EST from rss

Subject: Two Big Tests For Personal Rapid Transportation

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Al writes "A novel kind of transit system, in which cars are replaced by a network of automated electric vehicles, is about to get its first large-scale testing and deployment. Two of these Personal Rapid Transit (PRT) systems are being installed this year, one at Heathrow International Airport, near London, and one in the United Arab Emirates, where it will be the primary source of transportation in Masdar City, a development that will eventually accommodate 50,000 people and 1,500 businesses and is designed to emit no carbon dioxide. The article examines these two systems and includes video that includes an animation of the PRT system in action."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/WV8Kq-HtUWs/article.pl

[#] Tue Feb 10 2009 14:43:00 EST from rss

Subject: Shifting Apps To ARM Chips Could Save Laptop Batteries

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

An anonymous reader writes "When is an Intel PC not an Intel PC? When it moves applications such as Internet browsing and email on to an ARM processor because it can get longer battery life. And according to a story at EE Times, this hybrid Intel-ARM processor approach is being taken by PC makers as prominent as Dell. The problem for Intel: Why would you switch out of 'all-day' mode and use the Intel processor? The problem for ARM: lacking support from Microsoft for Windows; the applications it runs for the PC have to do so under Linux."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/KDWeQtdiO3s/article.pl

[#] Wed Feb 11 2009 23:45:00 EST from rss

Subject: MS To Offer Free Windows 7 Upgrade To Vista Users

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

crazyeyes writes "With Windows 7 set for release in Dec. 09, Microsoft is getting ready with their free upgrade program, which allows Vista and XP users to switch to Windows 7 when it arrives. The folks at TechARP have consistently scored accurate scoops on Microsoft software releases. They have now revealed Microsoft's upgrade plans, schedules and even screenshots of the upgrade process."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/NkIzTusRQkw/article.pl

[#] Wed Feb 11 2009 22:43:00 EST from rss

Subject: Next Pwn2Own Contest Targets IE8, Firefox, iPhone

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Windows Secrets writes "After two straight years of taking dead aim at Macbooks and Windows-powered machines, hackers at this year's CanSecWest conference will have shiny new targets: Web browsers and mobile phones. According to CanSecWest organisers, there will be two separate Pwn2Own competitions this year — one pitting hackers against IE8, Firefox 3 and Safari and another targeting Google Android, Apple iPhone, Nokia Symbian and Windows Mobile."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/lbQrr5ephpk/article.pl

[#] Wed Feb 11 2009 22:00:00 EST from rss

Subject: BeOS Successor Haiku Keeps the Faith

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

kokito writes "OSNews managing editor Thom Holwerda reviews Haiku, the open source successor of the Be operating system. According to the review, Haiku faithfully/successfully replicates the BeOS user experience and 'personality,' boasting very short boot times, the same recognizable but modernized GUI using antialiasing for fonts and all vector graphics as well as vector icons, a file system with support for metadata-based queries (OpenBFS) and support for the BeAPI, considered by some the cleanest programming API ever. The project has also recently released a native GCC 4.3.3 tool chain, clearing the way for bringing up-to-date ports of multi-platform apps such as Firefox and VLC, and making it easier to work on Haiku ports in general." (More below.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/7SGmcVSdhSw/article.pl

Go to page: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 ... Last