Language:
switch to room list switch to menu My folders
Go to page: First ... 7 8 9 10 [11] 12 13 14 15 ... Last
[#] Wed Oct 02 2013 22:25:52 EDT from Sig @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

It's bad that medical insurance does not cover dental, so dentists' offices are the moral/ethical equivalent of a whorehouse? Other than operating on a cash basis, I'm not seeing how that follows at all.



[#] Wed Oct 02 2013 22:53:40 EDT from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Oct 2 2013 7:25pm from Sig @uncnsrd (Uncensored) in Politics & Propaganda>

It's bad that medical insurance does not cover dental, so dentists'
offices are the moral/ethical equivalent of a whorehouse? Other than

operating on a cash basis, I'm not seeing how that follows at all.



Dental "insurance" - at least here in California - is an absolute fraud. At best they pay roughly 40% on major procedures.

The emphasis is, and properly so, on preventive care. Cleanings, minor repairs, exams. Relatively cheap, even free. Need a root canal? Hundreds in co-pay. And the follow-up procedure (post and core, followed by crown) sets you back roughly a grand. And that is WITH insurance.

And the dentists are **very** picky on which policies they accept, each of which pays the DENTIST every MONTH even if you do NOT have anything done in that month. The insurance industry calls such plans "capitation" plans.

Yes.

Whorehouses.



[#] Thu Oct 03 2013 12:30:12 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]


Ah, now that I think of it, I was wrong. The closest I ever came to a combat situation was to attend a primary leadership development course in South Korea.
It was close, in that if North Korea ever decided it wanted to invade South Korea, I'm sure I wouldn't get a ticket back to my duty station (Japan)... I would have been expected to fight.

Never before had I experienced a place that felt so prepared for warfare.
It was in the air, as it were. You could feel a sort of background tension. Imagine living with that, and still making all those consumer items we like to buy from Korea. It's downright weird.

But, no, I don't think I'd want to be set for life. I don't think that would have been good for me, to be honest. You have to make a big adjustment, leaving the military and going civilian, but I'm glad I made it. The military life is kind of weird.

[#] Thu Oct 03 2013 13:15:26 EDT from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]


But, no, I don't think I'd want to be set for life. I don't think
that would have been good for me, to be honest. You have to make a big

adjustment, leaving the military and going civilian, but I'm glad I
made it. The military life is kind of weird.



The idea is not to "set you up for life." Rather, the idea is to properly compensate you for your service to our country, and for the risk to life and limb that you freely assumed and to which you swore that solemn oath.

We cannot afford to compensate you with enough money at the time you are serving, so we must do it for you after your term of service ends honorably.

The way I view that is to address the issue on several fronts:

1. tuition-free attendance at any college at which you qualify for admission for five academic years (10 semesters full time) or attainment of the Baccalaureate degree, whichever happens first.

2. preferential treatment for employment in any government job (we are already doing this).

3. free medical benefits (already doing this), however NOT with the VA (which almost everyone agrees sucks) but through Medicare (which just about all recipients agree is amazingly good for a "government supported program" - at least pre-Obama"care" - time will tell on *that* thing).

4. preferential treatment on home purchase-money first mortgage for your principal (primary) residence. This can take several forms, and I've already addressed my personal favorite (please see prior post about 3 days ago).

Again, this all would need to be "fleshed out" in the form of actual legislation or modification to existing rules/regulations (whichever is required by existing law).

My "bet" is that these proposals would *not* add a significant amount to the Federal deficit - a lot of these things have positive benefit to the economy "at large" and would, through that fact, act to actually **increase** over-all federal tax revenue (without increasing *tax rates* at all!). In Government-Lingo, the CBO would "score" this favorably.

And finally, this is not a "charity" program. It is a way to adequately and properly compensate those men and women who have honorably served our nation in the military since it is not financially practical to pay them enough money while they are actually serving.

Not charity.
Justice.
Flavored with a BIG THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE!

[#] Thu Oct 03 2013 14:28:07 EDT from Sig @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

The current education benefits (with the post 9/11 GI Bill et al) are not far from what you are describing.

[#] Thu Oct 03 2013 14:42:42 EDT from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]


For the past 2+ days of "government shutdown" we have been bombarded with "this is closed; that is scaled back; this is running; that is only partly available" etc. etc. etc.

And totals of the several hundred thousand or more government "workers" that are deemed "non-essential" personnel.

One of the **best** possible side benefits of this "shutdown" is the illustration, by their absence, of just HOW WELL the government is actually continuing to function while alledly "shut down."

Which leads to the question...

If these workers are 'non-essential' then why do we continue to tolerate their existence on the public payroll using our wallets as teats????f

If they are non-essential, then get *rid* of them. We don't *need* them. If we did need them, they would be "essential."

Private industry does not hire nonessential personnel with the glaring exception of nepotism. And while that is widespread, it does not even begin to approach the level of payroll-waste in the Civil "Service" arena.

Frank Rizzo, mayor of Philadelphia (1972-1980) on his first week in office laid off roughly 60% of the civil service staff in the Philly city government. He did not make a "big deal" of this - he just did it - along with the comment "let's see who notices." Nobody noticed. The city continued to funcion; the municipal courts stayed open, the jails remained secure, the cops stayed on duty as did the firefighters. The only thing that happened was that in the offices, roughly 7 out of 10 office "workers" were laid off with *absolutely* *no* *detrimental* *effect* to the functioning of city offices or city services. Nobody noticed because *nothing* was hurt. And an extraordinary amount of city money was saved (by not being spent on salaries, benefits, etc.). I know. Frank was a distant cousin of mine, and I was living close by while all this happened.

So the *real* question the Democrats are afraid folks might ask is starting to *be* asked.

Just how much of the Federal Government do we really *need*?
And since it so obviously appears we don't need it, why *keep* it?
Maybe we are better off leaving it "shut down."

[#] Thu Oct 03 2013 16:31:06 EDT from Sig @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

I don't disagree with you on the general point, but non-essential frequently means "we can get by for a little while without this." If I hadn't already been on leave for two weeks, I would have been furloughed yesterday and the day before; the temporary authorizations are sorted out and all of the full-time National Guard people where I work are back in the office now.

But my drill weekend (and everyone else's) got cancelled. It's not essential--in the short term.

[#] Thu Oct 03 2013 18:07:57 EDT from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]


Cancelling your drill weekend is political posturing at its worse.
Typical for Barack Hussein Obama and his bumbling crew of cohorts.

Anything impacting the readiness of the military in any way, including the National Guard and the reserves is folly at its highest, and in the case of the President of the United States a violation of his Oath of Office wherein he swore to preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.


Obama has already amply demonstrated - by his actions and by his inactions and omissions - that he has virtually no respect for the Constitution, no interest in protecting the Constitution, and actively works *against* preserving the Constitution.

I could list the impeachable acts that His Incompetence has committed. I won't. You have already heard them, read them, and are by now just as able to recite them as am I.


I will close with only one more sentence.

What would they have done to Obama had he been Richard Nixon?

[#] Thu Oct 03 2013 23:58:43 EDT from ax25 @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

 

Thu Oct 03 2013 12:30:12 PM EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

Ah, now that I think of it, I was wrong. The closest I ever came to a combat situation was to attend a primary leadership development course in South Korea.
It was close, in that if North Korea ever decided it wanted to invade South Korea, I'm sure I wouldn't get a ticket back to my duty station (Japan)... I would have been expected to fight.

Never before had I experienced a place that felt so prepared for warfare.
It was in the air, as it were. You could feel a sort of background tension. Imagine living with that, and still making all those consumer items we like to buy from Korea. It's downright weird.

But, no, I don't think I'd want to be set for life. I don't think that would have been good for me, to be honest. You have to make a big adjustment, leaving the military and going civilian, but I'm glad I made it. The military life is kind of weird.

Did not know you were in S. Korea fleeb.  My story from there there is one that made me decide to not re-enlist.  The US Army used  a South Korean contractor for outer perimeter guard duty back when I was there.  Well, it seemed that they were miffed about pay and working conditions and decided to go on strike.  The bad part was that they decided to keep the shotguns and other arms that they used to do patrols and go from base to base to see if they could exact some compensation.

I was on the fence line with ammo thinking what the hell is going on here.  I had not considered a conflict with armed South Koreans as being in the realm of possibilities (although my dad had done some time in Seoul breaking up student riots before me, so I was not completely unfamiliar with the possibility).  It still made me think long and hard about some decisions I had made back in the 10th grade to sign up (not sure if you can still do that - delayed entry thing).  Getting a 10th grader to sign up is probably wrong.  I was impressed by the cool t-shirt my brother brought back from Panama during his tour.  I guess I might have been somewhat impressionable :-)  Anyway, I did not have to fire on the marauding horde of contractors, and for that I am grateful.

Not quite a "war story", but more of a - consider your options story.  I agree with you that the atmosphere was one of constant fear of the other shoe dropping though - especially when all of the bases would go on high alert during the changing of the tankers at the DMZ.  Freaked me out the first time it happened (of course at 2 - 3 am every time).



[#] Fri Oct 04 2013 00:04:27 EDT from ax25 @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Speaking of shutdown follies.  I notice the fcc.gov site (which mostly holds static information about licenses), is "shut down" as they don't have the staffing to maintain it.  Not so much shut down as redirected and shuttered.  Well, it would seem that the ftp site with a bunch of forms is still running just fine (ftp.fcc.gov).  Much of the data is out of date as far as licenses, but it would seem that someone saw fit to update some of the commonly used forms for applying for licenses as of August of 2013.

Wonder who has to go unplug that server to save face :-)



[#] Fri Oct 04 2013 00:19:48 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]


Gads... that would have been a very awkward and potentially dangerous situation, having to deal with armed and disgruntled workers.

[#] Fri Oct 04 2013 10:38:24 EDT from LoanShark @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

One of the **best** possible side benefits of this "shutdown" is the

illustration, by their absence, of just HOW WELL the government is
actually continuing to function while alledly "shut down."

Not really... let me give you two examples:

(1) my ski/snowboard buddy moved to Maine and plans to open a micro-brewery and "tasting room." For this needs an ATF permit (TTB to be specific.)

http://m.seacoastonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=%2F20131004%2FNEWS%2F310040408%2F-1%2FWAP&template=wapart

(2) 1 million Federal workers have been "forced" to work without pay.

Regardless of how you feel about the appropriate size of government in the long-run, you must agree the current situation is disruptive and untenable.

[#] Fri Oct 04 2013 10:46:26 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Aparently there is enough money to pay park rangers to turn people away but not enough money to pay them to do
their assigned jobs.

[#] Fri Oct 04 2013 11:18:38 EDT from Sig @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Especially hilarious for monuments like the WWII one, which are privately funded and entirely open; there's no need for a "ranger" at all. Even the guides were volunteers when I was there.

Highly recommended if you've never been, btw.

[#] Fri Oct 04 2013 15:00:08 EDT from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Oct 4 2013 7:46am from zooer @uncnsrd (Uncensored) in Politics & Propaganda>

Aparently there is enough money to pay park rangers to turn people away
but not enough money to pay them to do
their assigned jobs.


And when you consider that the Federal Government is utilizing far more personnel to "guard" the WW2 Memorial than they were willing to send to Benghazi to save LIVES....

THAT is OBSCENE.

[#] Fri Oct 04 2013 15:01:46 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

It is almost as if government was one big bullshit act with two sides shoveling to see who can fling the shit
higher or faster.

[#] Fri Oct 04 2013 20:16:05 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]


If you're just figuring that out, you're a little late to the (political) party.

[#] Sat Oct 05 2013 10:09:56 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

No, not just figuring it out I am just surprised that other people are surprised by the foolish crap. "Holy
crap! They are screwing around! but hooray for our side! The other side is totally different and much worse!"

[#] Sun Oct 06 2013 12:24:15 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

And when you consider that the Federal Government is utilizing far more personnel to "guard" the WW2 Memorial than they were willing to send to Benghazi to save LIVES....

THAT is OBSCENE.

It's all political posturing.  That's really the most obscene thing about this administration, and the one that will do the most long-term damage: this administration introduced Chicago-style thug politics to Washington.  There was always a political struggle but now it's a war and the communist media and academia are gleefully participating in it.  The thug-in-chief is relying on the communist media to get out a message "see how much pain is being caused by the shutdown -- this is their fault!"  Fortunately that plan does not seem to be working as well as they were hoping.  People are seeing that the world didn't end, things are still mostly getting done, and they're realizing that perhaps those million government workers aren't so essential after all.

As expected ... people continue to believe what they already did, and continue to blame whoever they already blamed.



[#] Wed Oct 09 2013 09:57:04 EDT from vince-q @ Cascade Lodge BBS

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]



POTUS-KICK-OUT.jpg (image/jpeg, 69963 bytes) [ View | Download ]
Go to page: First ... 7 8 9 10 [11] 12 13 14 15 ... Last