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[#] Thu Jul 06 2017 07:00:02 EDT from rss

Subject: Thursday Morning Fly By: Already bored.

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Today's open discussion thread, complete with your daily dose of Philadelphia Flyers news and notes...

*One of the best things about the Flyers under Ron Hextall is that he's taking a measured, logical approach to making this team great. One of the worst things about the Flyers under Ron Hextall is that it means nothing is happening. So uh...hey Michael Del Zotto wanted to be more offensive while he was here and is psyched to get back to that in Vancouver. [ProHockeyTalk]

*The Flyers and the Lehigh Valley Phantoms have been partners for three seasons now. How's it working? [The Morning Call]

*More than a couple of this year's free agents decided to go back to teams they've played for before. DGB has five Hall of Famers who did the same thing. [The Hockey News]

*Not all of the free agents have signed, which means that we've got at least a couple more weeks of "who's left?" articles to look at. First up, the most notable FAs remaining. [ProHockeyTalk]

*And now, the seasoned vets who haven't yet found a new home. [The Hockey News]

*It would seem that there is a shift in the balance of power in the NHL going on. [USA Today]

*One of the contract extensions that we're expecting to see this summer is that of John Tavares, but he's still without a new deal. What's up with that? [Newsday]

*Know who did sign an extension? Connor McDavid! Who is very rich now! [TSN]

*And finally, did you miss Steph and Bill on The 700 Level? No worries, we've got you. [BSH]





[#] Fri Jul 07 2017 07:00:01 EDT from rss

Subject: Friday Morning Fly By: There will be actual Flyers on actual ice today!

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Today's open discussion thread, complete with your daily dose of Philadelphia Flyers news and notes...

*Flyers development camp opens today! You going? Anyhoo here's Meltzer with a rundown of what to expect from the kids up in Vorhees this weekend. [Hockeybuzz]

*And here we have a handy guide with everything you need to know heading into camp. [Metro Philly]

*NOLAN PATRICK!!!!! [Flyers]

*July and August are the worst, most hockey-less months of the year, but thankfully we have our pal Kate to take us back to the hockey season when things were good and life wasn't empty and meaningless. She's going to be bringing us galleries of the best pictures she snapped this season and first up: Wayne Simmonds. [BSH]

*The Lehigh Valley Phantoms made some signings yesterday to shore up their team for the upcoming season. [The AHL]

*There always seems to be talk of the Flyers needing a "sniper". Turns out quantifying shooting talent is kinda hard; so who is the best shooting talent in the league? [TSN]

*And finally, our old friend Rick Tocchet may end up being offered the head coaching position in Arizona. What a time to be alive. Congrats, Tocc! [Puck Daddy]





[#] Fri Jul 07 2017 18:36:51 EDT from rss

Subject: Nolan Patrick opens up at development camp, says health-wise he was

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If last season only was 75% of the real Nolan Patrick, the Flyers have found themselves quite a player.

When Nolan Patrick underwent sports hernia surgery in the summer of 2016, it was expected that he would be perfectly healthy and ready to go for his final season leading up to the 2017 NHL Draft. Instead, Patrick suffered through a season hampered by a mysterious injury, later revealed to be a second sports hernia that originally went undiagnosed.

But just how injured was Nolan Patrick last year? After all, he did play in 33 regular season games and finished with 46 total points - hardly a pedestrian effort - and was still impressive enough to justify the Flyers using the second overall pick in the draft on him in June.

As it turns out, this was no minor issue for the 18-year old prospect.

“I was probably 60 percent when I first started playing [last season],” Patrick admitted today at Flyers development camp. “Then I maybe got up to 70, 75 tops. I never had any wind during games. I’d lose my energy really quick, trying to skate with that injury.”

Despite being obviously hampered, Patrick’s point per game ratio of 1.39 in 2016-17 basically matched his 1.41 ratio in his breakout 2015-16 season, during which he led the Brandon Wheat Kings to the Memorial Cup and was named MVP of the WHL playoffs. In addition, Brandon had lost key contributors Ivan Provorov, John Quenneville and Jayce Hawryluk to the professional ranks for the 2016-17 season, resulting in a weaker overall squad.

The expectation was that Patrick’s raw production would jump in his draft year, but considering the circumstances and the impact of his injury, simply holding steady seems like quite an accomplishment in retrospect. In fact, if you accept that Patrick was about 70% of his true self last season and want to have some fun with math, that would give him an injury-adjusted 1.95 point-per-game ratio at full strength, right in line with the stellar draft years of Mitch Marner (2.00 PPG) and Dylan Strome (1.98).

Nevertheless, Patrick still was able to produce at an very high level, even with the notable handicap.

“It [was] mostly sharp pain in skating,” Patrick explained. “That’s the main thing that bothered me, my skating couldn’t really get to where it needed to be. You get tired a lot quicker. It’s tough to explain it, but it’s kind of a sharp, shooting pain in the lower stomach.”

When asked why he didn’t simply shut things down early in the year due to the injury, Patrick was frank.

“I just didn’t want to miss the whole season of my draft year, so I just tried to play as much as can.”

Due to his surgery, the Flyers’ top forward prospect will not be participating in the on-ice events at Development camp, but Patrick is not concerned about the recovery process and expects to be back on the ice sometime next week.

“It’s not like it’s a four-week recovery and then it still bugs you for a while,” he pointed out. “It’s pretty much four weeks and then you’re ready to go. I’m feeling really good now and I’m really excited to get back on the ice.”

Patrick was reassured as well by the sterling reputation of Dr. William Myers, who performed the surgery.

“I talked to a few other doctors in Winnipeg and they said Meyers is the top guy in that area so I just waited to see him.

[Flyers’ trainer] Jimmy McCrossin is the main guy that I’ve been working with [on rehab], and he said he’s not ever seen a guy have [a sports hernia] again after Dr. Meyers has done [the surgery], so that’s positive.”

In the meantime, Patrick will still be participating in the off-ice portion of camp, and the soon-to-be-19-year-old is focused on digesting as much information as possible from the Flyers’ coaches.

“I’ve been watching some film that they were showing us this morning, and drills to do. I was watching the drills today. It’s kinda something I can take back and do some of it at home with my skills coach, and obviously do some of it when I’m skating here. There’s a lot to learn and I’m just going to try and learn as much as I can here. Obviously I’d like to take part in the on-ice stuff but it is what it is.”

The injury issues may have been a driving force in dropping Patrick from first overall to No. 2 in last month’s draft, but the young center did note that he learned one key lesson from his trying season.

“That I can play decent hurt, I guess.”

The Flyers are obviously hoping that he’ll be even better once fully healthy, a day that appears to be fast approaching.





[#] Mon Jul 10 2017 07:00:02 EDT from rss

Subject: Monday Morning Fly By: All rookies all summer, baby.

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Today's open discussion thread, complete with your daily dose of Philadelphia Flyers news and notes...

*We've got a full weekend of development camp behind us; you guys make it to any of the sessions? Evidently Oskar Lindblom looks good. [Courier-Post]

*We're getting our first look at guys like big big big boy Isaac Ratcliffe. [Daily News]

*Nolan Patrick isn't on the ice (yet), but he was still at camp to speak with reporters. You know last season, when he averaged well over a point per game? He was only operating at like, 75%. Which is amazing. So excited for this kid. [BSH]

*Good news is Patrick should be able to start skating next week! [NBC Sports]

*So Nolan Patrick is the most exciting thing going right now but in a couple years the fun news is going to revolve around our young goalies. Carter Hart and Felix Sandstrom are going to battle for the #1 job in this town and it's going to be fun to watch. [Courier-Post]

*Oh yeah, we also have all these badass kids on defense! Phillippe Myers and Travis Sanheim are hoping to play their way onto the team this year. No more waiting. Being a Flyers fan is so fun right now lol. [Flyers]

*But whooooo will make the team? [Daily News]

*And finally, here's a pretty full run down of observations from this weekend's festivities. [CSN Philly]





[#] Mon Jul 10 2017 11:51:43 EDT from rss

Subject: Observations from 2017 Philadelphia Flyers development camp

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After three days of development camp, which players impressed the most?

Development camp serves as the de facto yearly conclusion to the offseason for the Philadelphia Flyers. Coming after the NHL Draft and in the wake of the usual July 1 madness, camp is a time for fans to get a firsthand look at the organization’s entire prospect pool, before taking a brief break from the sport of hockey until training camp in September.

During his media availability on Friday, general manager Ron Hextall was careful to note that development camp is meant for teaching the young prospects, not evaluating them, a sentiment that Nolan Patrick echoed as well. A prospect isn’t going to fall in the estimation of the organization because he struggled with a couple drills, or looked uncomfortable adapting to a newly-taught technique.

However, there is some evaluation value in development camp. Specifically, it gives both the organization and fans a better understanding of each individual player’s skillset. Hextall and his scouts surely watch hours of tape during the year on each of their prospects, but viewing them up close does help in picking up the subtle elements of their respective games. Not only is it a “learning camp” for the players, it is for the coaches and front office as well.

But the real value is for the fans, who generally speaking, do not have the ability to regularly watch Canadian junior hockey or leagues over in Europe. For all but the most diehard watchers, this is the first time in the calendar year that fans get to see most of the prospect pool.

And what a prospect pool it is. Out of the 40 players at camp, at least 25 of them fall somewhere between “intriguing sleeper” and “top-tier prospect.” That depth is the envy of every NHL team, and it makes for an especially intriguing camp.

Camp will continue through Wednesday, concluding with a 3v3 tournament and then the yearly Trial on the Isle event in Stone Harbor. But three days worth of sessions is enough to make some early observations regarding which players’ skillsets stood out, and which prospects showed significant year-over-year improvement. Obviously, all of these opinions are subjective and my own.

Oskar Lindblom

 Kate Frese
Oskar Lindblom skates at Flyers 2017 Development Camp in Voorhees.

With Samuel Morin and Robert Hagg not at camp, and Nolan Patrick absent from on-ice drills due to his recent surgery, Oskar Lindblom was the prospect with the best chance of being on the Flyers’ opening night roster come October who fans could actually watch at camp. As a result, eyes were on him this year in the same way they were on Ivan Provorov and Travis Konecny in 2016. Lindblom is the exciting prospect, the guy who killed it in Sweden and is expected by many to make a major impact with the big club in 2016-17. It was understandable that fans might have expected him to “pop” in these sessions in the same way that Provorov and Konecny did.

But that’s just not Lindblom’s game. What they did see was basically the same player from last year’s camp, except a little stronger and a little faster. Luckily, Lindblom was one of the most impressive guys (to my eyes) at the 2016 camp, so this result is far from a bad thing. It’s just that Oskar Lindblom is not going to fly around the ice, dangle his way past defensemen in drills, and rip high-velocity slappers at will.

Instead, he was merely the strongest player in every physical drill, and for the third straight camp, improved his skating from the previous year. He’s no Travis Sanheim in terms of speed, but watch him now and you’d never know that skating was once a major problem for him. It’s easily NHL caliber now. Where Lindblom really shines, though, is in the subtle areas — going backhand-to-forehand with the puck (lightning quick), soft hands around the net, and general hockey smarts. During one 4v3 drill, Lindblom skated through the slot without the puck and essentially set a pick on Philippe Myers, opening up space for Wade Allison (the best shooter at camp) to skate uncontested into a high-danger area and unleash a wrister. It was an instinctual play that even many NHL forwards wouldn’t think to do.

Lindblom is absolutely ready to join the Flyers from a physical standpoint, not that it’s a huge surprise considering his success in the SHL against grown men. As for the rest of his skillset, it continues to improve each year. I saw nothing this weekend to change my opinion that Oskar Lindblom will be on the Flyers in 2017-18.

Travis Sanheim

 Kate Frese
Travis Sanheim skates for the Phantoms in a March game against Wilkes-Barre/Scranton.

Skating drills tend to be fairly dull to watch, but I could spend all day admiring Travis Sanheim’s technique and never get bored. Everything is so fluid when it comes to Sanheim’s skating, from his first steps to his change-of-direction to his full speed stride. In drills, while his campmates were clearly trying to master slight adjustments to their technique, Sanheim was in a private competition with himself, trying to make a high-difficulty pivot move just a little bit faster or a turn just a bit sharper. No one matched him.

But we all know that Sanheim is a fantastic skater. What will decide when he makes his NHL debut is his defensive play without the puck, and I’m happy to report that this was the best he’s looked in that area at a development camp. In D-zone coverage drills on Sunday, Sanheim showed solid positional awareness, and was using his frame far more effectively than he has in past years to directly challenge opposing forwards. That’s not to say he was perfect — he made mistakes, including one rep where he lost his man in front of the net, which prompted Sanheim to slam his stick against the boards in frustration. But while in past years his “good-to-bad rep” ratio in coverage drills was around 50/50, this time it was closer to 75/25. He’s clearly making progress.

Philippe Myers

This was the first time that Myers has participated in a Flyers development camp, since he wasn’t a member of the organization in the summer of 2015 and was recovering from surgery last year. I suspect the fans in Voorhees came away very impressed with their first live viewing of the 20-year old defenseman. Myers isn’t quite at Sanheim’s level in terms of skating, but he’s legitimately plus in that area despite his 6’5 frame. His mechanics are a bit odd, as he was using lots of little strides to get going or to skate laterally rather than a few powerful ones, but the end result in terms of speed is fine. And once he gets going, Myers can absolutely fly.

Where Myers did outplay Sanheim was on the defensive side. He was a beast in one-on-one drills, using his long reach to stop opposing forwards in their tracks. And despite being a year younger than Sanheim, Myers showed a better feel for positioning in defensive zone coverage as well. He also stood out relative to his peers in corner puck battle drills. Hextall noted that Myers’ lack of AHL experience probably puts him fourth in the pecking order in the NHL roster battle come September, but the guy who showed up at this camp doesn’t seem far away from being ready for the big club.

 Kate Frese
Philippe Myers is tall.

Mike Vecchione

Considering the fact that Mike Vecchione is six years older than the youngest players at this development camp, it’s fair to say that he should appear head-and-shoulders above his peers. But a player still has to go out there and legitimately look that good, which Vecchione did with ease this weekend. He was one of the best skaters at the camp, and also had one of the better shots. As for physicality, despite not being an especially big player, his functional strength was obvious. There’s a reason why the coaches paired him with Lindblom during puck battle drills on Saturday — Vecchione was the only forward there who could hang with the powerful Swede.

This is a polished hockey player who knows the tricks of the trade, from disguising his intentions pre-shot, to getting off decent chances even with a defenseman hanging all over him. I’m not sure what his ceiling truly is, but it was clear that Vecchione was too good for this camp.

Morgan Frost

2017 NHL Draft - Portraits Stacy Revere/Getty Images
Morgan Frost at the NHL Draft.

On Friday, I came away a bit disappointed with Morgan Frost. He certainly was not actively bad in any of the drills, but none of his skills stood out. That’s why I was surprised when I heard from a few people that Frost had looked fantastic on Saturday, as I had missed both of his sessions in order to watch other groups. So during the Sunday session, I made it a point to observe Frost very closely. It certainly seems like the first round pick was merely getting his feet wet on the first day of camp, because he shone bright Sunday.

To start, his top-end speed is stellar. But just as important as his skating ability is the fact that he showed no problem executing high-difficulty puck handling moves while at that impressive top gear. The puck was glued to his stick on rush drills, and Frost didn’t have to sacrifice any speed to do it. He also showcased good passing vision in 3v2 drills, finding open men even while under heavy pressure from checkers. Frost simply looked like an obvious first-round talent, which is reassuring considering the fact that many fans viewed him as something of a reach with the No. 27 selection. He came the closest out of the forward prospects to “popping” out at you in the same way that Konecny did during his two camps.

Tanner Laczynski

Probably the player who surprised me the most (in a good way) at this camp, Tanner Laczynski looked the part of a high-end forward prospect. He obviously impressed in his freshman season at Ohio State last year, but he’s still generally viewed as a cut below the best Flyers prospects, probably due to the fact that he was taken in the sixth round. That might be shortchanging Laczynski. His skillset was far closer to players like Frost, German Rubtsov and Oskar Lindblom than mid-tier prospects like Wade Allison, Pascal Laberge and Connor Bunnaman.

Compared to last year’s camp, Laczynski appeared to be more solidly built, and his skating went from good to borderline great. It was especially apparent in his edges and turns, which were crisp and came without sacrificing any speed. He also was a top performer in one-handed puck handling drills, as the frozen piece of rubber seemed taped to Laczynski’s stick even as he skated faster than almost any other forward. Last year, Laczynski tread close to “just a guy” territory at camp; this year, he was a legitimate standout.

German Rubtsov

 Kate Frese
2016 first-round pick German Rubtsov looked the part at his second dev camp.

The one player who had a case for topping Laczynski in the one-handed puck handling drill was German Rubtsov, who flew through the exercise. Throughout the weekend, I was struck by how smooth of a skater Rubtsov is. Aside from Sanheim, he had the most effortless stride at the camp, and flashed a strong top gear on a few occasions. Like Frost, Rubtsov definitely looked the part of a first round pick, though his finishing ability and shot probably could use some work.

Wade Allison

One player whose finishing ability needs little work at all is Wade Allison, as he very obviously possessed the best shot at camp. It’s accurate with a quick release and some serious zip, and he remains the organization’s best hope for a homegrown, high-volume shooting forward. Goalies are not going to like seeing this guy in the offensive zone.

Allison’s skating, on the other hand, is more polarizing. One observer at camp called his technique “a mess,” and I can see the point to a degree. He doesn’t have a compact stride, and his first few steps before getting to top speed could be better. But he’s far from slow. In fact, he was one of the better players in terms of change-of-direction ability in corner puck battle drills, with his stop/start move fooling a number of defensemen. And subjectively, he looks fast, even if the way he does it is nowhere near as pretty as Sanheim or Rubtsov. I wonder if overhauling his technique would even be a good thing for Allison, because his current style does seem to work for him.

Mark Friedman

This was Mark Friedman’s fourth development camp, and the fourth time that saw him treat every drill as if it would decide the fate of his career. Joe Pergola called Saturday’s mixed session (both forwards and defensemen) “The Mark Friedman Show,” and he wasn’t wrong. The 21-year old blueliner was a menace, showcasing expert pokechecking to disrupt forwards and surprising strength to separate them from the puck. Noah Cates was an early victim of Friedman’s high-intensity approach to drills.

Every year, Friedman dominates in these drills. It’s tough to know if it’s just because he takes them more seriously than anyone else at camp, or if he’s simply that good. My guess is that he approaches these camps with a major chip on his shoulder, trying to ward off the “he’s too small!” tag and to make a name for himself in an organization that has at least six defensemen under the age of 25 above him on the depth chart.

All I know is that his compete level always stands out, and yet again, he looked the part of a blue chip prospect in the on-ice portion of development camp. I’m excited that now I will finally be able to watch him play meaningful hockey this year with the Phantoms and determine how much of his dominance in drills translates to games.

Carter Hart

Texas Rangers v Seattle Mariners Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images
Carter Hart, the only Flyers prospect to ever throw out the first pitch at a Seattle Mariners game.

Carter Hart was paired with Felix Sandstrom, which allowed for easy comparisons to be made between the two goalies considered to be the Flyers’ best chances at a true franchise netminder. To my eyes, Hart was more impressive. Sandstrom flashed a bit more athleticism, but that was because he was occasionally forced to do so as a result of being out of position. Hart, on the other hand, was as steady as they come.

There’s a real economy of movement to Hart’s game, as he’s set and square to the shooter very quickly, and I didn’t see him overpursue the puck once. His anticipation was also notable, as he showed a knack for reading passes immediately and being in ideal position to stop the recipient before he even corralled the puck.

If there was one critique I could make regarding Hart’s performance at camp, it’s that he did occasionally make himself small in net on rushes, giving the shooters lots of space up high to pick the corners. NHL forwards will exploit that. But on the whole, Hart was very impressive.

Isaac Ratcliffe

To paraphrase Dennis Green, Isaac Ratcliffe is who I thought he was. The giant forward obviously oozes potential, and watching a 6’6 player perform a lightning quick dangle less than a foot from the goalie and then roof the puck will have even the most restrained fan jumping out of his or her seat. But Ratcliffe is far from a finished product.

His skating is strong, but the soft hands that he shows off around the net do not appear when at full stride. On more than a few occasions, Ratcliffe fumbled the puck or failed to cleanly receive a pass when blasting down the wing at speed. That needs to be fixed.

And despite his frame, Ratcliffe wasn’t physically dominant in the corners. On Saturday, defensemen far smaller than he (such as Friedman) had little trouble picking Ratcliffe’s pocket as he tried to protect the puck along the boards. It seemed to be a technique issue more than a lack of strength, but regardless, one would think Ratcliffe might excel at a drill like that considering his frame, and it simply wasn’t the case.

That’s not to say I’m low on Ratcliffe. He’s huge, and guys that big who can also skate well and flash plus puck skills don’t come around often. But he’s a project, in the same way that Samuel Morin was a project when he was taken back in 2013. Don’t expect him to get fast-tracked to the NHL level.

 Kate Frese
Isaac Ratcliffe takes a shot during a Saturday session at 2017 Flyers Development Camp.

Quick hits and other observations

  • There was almost always a coach standing by Matthew Strome during any drills primarily focused on skating, watching him intently and giving pointers.
  • Connor Bunnaman looked to have the second-best shot out of the forwards, trailing only Wade Allison.
  • Cooper Marody was far stronger and more solidly built than the last time I saw him at camp. His best drill, however, was lateral skating and shooting.
  • Maksim Sushko can really fly. His puck handling, on the other hand, was spotty at best.
  • Linus Hogberg’s backwards skating was far better this year. In 2016, he was getting turnstiled often in rush coverage, but this time that issue was nowhere to be found.
  • David Bernhardt was the best defenseman in the corner puck battle drills on Saturday. Used his size and strength effectively.
  • Mikhail Vorobyov’s skillset doesn’t translate especially well to drills, but he did showcase soft hands around the net and crisp passing ability.
  • He’s quite raw, but Noah Cates certainly had his moments, especially in shooting drills. The puck absolutely jumps off his stick.
  • Pascal Laberge looked far better in rush drills than in the offensive zone cycle ones.
  • Watching Ivan Kosorenkov, it was surprising that no team was willing to even take a seventh round flier on him. His skillset wasn’t overwhelmingly impressive, but he was able to execute on a number of difficult maneuvers with the puck and didn’t look out of place in offensive zone drills alongside some of the Flyers’ better prospects. He didn’t dominate to the point where I’m certain the organization will offer him a contract, but he looked like he belonged at this camp.




[#] Mon Jul 10 2017 14:43:18 EDT from rss

Subject: Here

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It’s on Wednesday in Stone Harbor.

The Flyers have released the detailed schedule for Wednesday’s annual Trial On The Isle event in Stone Harbor. It’s part of the team’s annual Development Camp, and prospects from the organization will gather for team activities and to mingle with fans down at the Jersey Shore for the day.

Below is the schedule.

  • 9:15 a.m. – Prospect Beach Activities, 96th St. Beach
  • 10:15 a.m. – Team Games, 80th St. Recreation Field
  • 12:30 p.m. – Clinic for Kids, Stone Harbor Elementary School
  • 1:15 p.m. – Prospect Autograph Session, Stone Harbor Elementary School
  • 3:30 p.m. – Beach Volleyball Tournament, 96th St. Beach

The beach activities at 9:30 in the morning include warm-ups and “team building exercises” on the beach, including a sand castle contest. The players will race down the beach 16 blocks from 96th Street to 80th Street, participating in events along the way — a Frisbee toss, a home run derby, and a potato sack race.

Nolan Patrick, German Rubtsov, Travis Sanheim and Will O’Neill will host the kids hockey clinic at Stone Harbor Elementary School at 12:30, and all prospects will be

All of the events are free with the exception of the autograph session, which carries a $10 admission fee that will be donated to the American Legion post in Stone Harbor.

Here’s a map of the events:





[#] Tue Jul 11 2017 07:00:02 EDT from rss

Subject: Tuesday Morning Fly By: Another day, another round of dev camp funsies.

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Today's open discussion thread, complete with your daily dose of Philadelphia Flyers news and notes...

*Today in Vorhees, if you're lucky enough to be able to get out of work, you'll get to watch the kids run 3-on-3 drills!! That'll be super fun. But if you're stuck at work, no worries: Charlie was at camp all weekend and has some super good information to share with you. [BSH]

*Oskar Lindblom and Mike Vecchione are among the older tier of prospects so it's no real surprise to see them excelling. [Sons of Penn]

*Lindblom in particular seems primed to make the team. [Metro Philly]

*Travis Sanheim has come a long way since last year's development camp. [CSN Philly]

*Ron Hextall seems to have a talent for finding talented Russian players. [Inquirer]

*Even undrafted guys like Ivan Kosorenkov are making some noise so far this summer. [Courier-Post]

*Pascal Laberge has had a super rough time since his concussion last year, but he's hoping now he'll be able to show the Flyers what he's really made of. [CSN Philly]

*And tomorrow, the kids will #ShitTheBeach!!! Here's a full schedule of events in Stone Harbor tomorrow afternoon. [BSH]

*And finally, there are still some free agents floating around out there. Here's some bargains that might be considered. [TSN]





[#] Tue Jul 11 2017 10:00:08 EDT from rss

Subject: Riley Cote will not return as Phantoms assistant coach

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After seven years as an assistant coach, Cote will not be returning in 2017-18. BSH Radio spoke to him on Monday night to hear about his future plans.

After spending six seasons with the Philadelphia Flyers’ organization as a player, Riley Cote made the jump from on-ice enforcer to off-ice coach in the summer of 2010, signing on to be an assistant with the Phantoms of the American Hockey League. For almost seven years, Cote held that position as the franchise went through numerous leadership changes and even a move from Glen Falls to Allentown.

This summer, however, Cote is officially no longer a part of the Flyers organization for the first time since 2004.

Cote was a guest on Monday night’s episode of BSH Radio, where he revealed that his contract was not renewed for another season. With hockey coaching out of the equation for the time being, Cote is currently focusing on his Hemp Heals Foundation, which promotes sustainable agriculture, sustainable health and clean natural medicine, while focusing on a holistic approach to optimum health through the use of hemp.

In addition to promoting his upcoming Hemp Heals Music Festival, which occurs on August 4th at Festival Pier in Philadelphia, Cote was kind enough to answer questions regarding the players that he coached in his former role as assistant with the Lehigh Valley Phantoms. Considering the fact that he his “free agent” status allowed him to speak as an outsider and not as a member of the organization (but still as one with firsthand knowledge of the players), his answers were especially interesting.

BSH Radio: Obviously Flyers fans know the big names, the defensive prospects. But were there any kids that you coached that maybe were a bit more under-the-radar, that you really believe might make an impact at the NHL level in the near future?

Well, I would certainly say Taylor Leier. I know he’s had his little stints [in the NHL] and people know who he is, but as far as a quality human being, a quality worker, “gets it,” a pro — he’ll find his way for sure, whether it’s the Flyers or someone else. Surely he will.

He’s not so much of a young guy anymore, but a guy named Cole Bardreau. He’s extremely explosive, dangerous, a penalty killer, hard-nosed guy. Probably nothing more than a fourth line center role, penalty killer, but he’s the type of guy that you root for in a developmental league and you’d expect to develop for that role instead of paying a premium for a fourth line centerman, which I think you can develop those players. Especially a guy who can skate well and kill penalties.

Defense, obviously you said it, pretty obvious. But I think the Phantoms have done a great job at least in bringing a lot more veteran presence type guys that these young guys learn from. But for sure, for sure Taylor Leier. He’s something, and hopefully Cole finds a way as well.

BSH Radio: Did you see Jordan Weal’s game dramatically improve from the start of the season to where it was right before the call-up?

You know, I wouldn’t say dramatically, no. Weals is an unbelievable hockey player. This guy competes, he’s got unbelievable skill, he’s shifty, he cares, and he’s got the right attitude. I think he was the MVP of the league I think two years before that. This guy outgrew the American Hockey League two years ago. Unfortunately, he was screwed with politics last year with the Flyers, and I don’t remember how many games he ended up playing.

A guy like that, you can’t not play a guy like that. If he’s on your roster, you play the damn guy, because he is that good. He’s almost like Ghost when he came up with the Flyers. He actually has the ability to change games. So dynamic, full of energy, competes like a bastard. I would even say he competes at a much higher level than Ghost does, so he’s a guy that needs to play on the top two lines, you need to play this guy.

But right from the start of last year, he was on a mission. He just racked up the points. He still finished in the top-15 in scoring [in the AHL], he only played three-quarters of the year. I was happy to see him go, hurt losing him obviously, but I think he’s one of those guys if you give him an opportunity, you give him ice time and play him with good players, I think he’s going to surprise a lot of people how good he can actually be.

He’s that crafty, but he works so hard. I don’t know if I’ve coached a guy that does more little footwork, and picking up pucks in his skates, and picking up bad pucks, and just little things that I never have really seen guys work on that much. He cares. It was a great signing by the Flyers.

BSH Radio: What did you see out of Scott Laughton last year, and is this [upcoming season] his year?

I love Laughts to death. I think he just suffers from an identity crisis. I think he’s been an offensive guy his whole junior career, he’s been the “lean-on” guy, I think he had a hard time adjusting to a lesser role, [lines] three or four, you know what I mean? I think what he’s learned coming back down is that... he didn’t play on the power play, he didn’t play in offensive situations like that, so I think he’s able to absorb more of what he really, truly is.

It’s not a knock on his ability. But once you get to the NHL, there’s so many unbelievable talents, so you have to take a lesser role sometimes. I think for him, he’s a third line center probably max on a good team. But I think he has to buy into that role, because there’s a lot of responsibility that comes with that role. I think he needs to be just a little bit more gritty, maybe cut his losses a little bit more. I think he hangs onto the puck too much and gets into trouble, turns pucks over, and so he doesn’t have to carry the puck as much.

I think he works hard enough, gets on the puck hard enough, I think he just... we talked about it all the time: “Simplify his game.” Be a hard worker, be a reliable centerman, win faceoffs, kill penalties. There’s nothing wrong with that. There’s some guys — and I think he had an identity crisis — it’s hard to swallow when you’re a 90-point guy, almost 100-point guy in juniors. You think you’re just gonna hop right into the NHL and be an 80-point guy in the NHL, and it’s just not realistic. Tagging him [like that] before he made the Flyers... well, he made the Flyers, came back to the Phantoms, made the Flyers again, came back to the Phantoms again, I think it really just crushed his confidence. I think he just needs to come back in training camp and earn a job and just mean business. I think he has to have that attitude.





[#] Tue Jul 11 2017 11:15:02 EDT from rss

Subject: Development camp and Riley Cote keep the party going into July

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The gang is joined by former Phantoms coach Riley to talk prospects and good causes.

Breaking news: as the prospects congregate in Voorhees for their yearly development camp, BSH Radio is back to talk about the kids, with the help of special guest Riley Cote. Former Flyer and most recently former Phantoms assistant coach, Cote drops by to explain the details behind his Hemp Heals Foundation, before dishing out honest opinions on his past charges like Taylor Leier, Jordan Weal, and Scott Laughton. Then, it's all development camp, as Steph admits that Morgan Frost has won her over and Charlie runs through the players that impressed him most over the weekend.

You can listen below or on your mobile device thanks to iTunes, Google Play, and Soundcloud.

Follow us on twitter @BSH_Radio to join in the party!





[#] Tue Jul 11 2017 11:35:28 EDT from rss

Subject: Riley Cote says Jordan Weal

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The former Phantoms assistant coach saw Weal up close for two seasons and has a lot of good things to say about him.

After 13 years in the Flyers organization, Lehigh Valley Phantoms assistant coach Riley Cote is no longer around. We don’t know why Cote has left the organization -- whether it was voluntary or not, or what the reasoning behind it might be.

Regardless of that reasoning, Cote is now free to speak his mind -- more than he was previously, at least. And in an exclusive interview on BSH Radio last night, Cote had the most to say about Jordan Weal and the opportunity the former AHL playoff MVP has had at the NHL level thus far in his career.

“This guy competes, he’s got unbelievable skill, he’s shifty, he cares, and he’s got the right attitude,” Cote said of Weal. “I think he was the MVP of the league I think two years before that. This guy outgrew the American Hockey League two years ago. Unfortunately, he was screwed with politics last year with the Flyers, and I don’t remember how many games he ended up playing.”

Cote didn’t elaborate on those “politics,” and it’s not going to do us much good to speculate. You can feel free to do that yourself in the comments if you please. (Come on, we know you’re going to.)

But this has been the basis of the conversation around Weal for a long time, including in the run-up to his free agency this summer. Some say that he hasn’t earned an NHL gig with his play, be it in Los Angeles or Philadelphia. Some say he just hasn’t been viewed or used properly by NHL teams.

I tend to fall in that latter group. There’s always an awkward spot that these talented top-line AHL — or, more aptly, so-called “AAAA” players — fall into. NHL teams tend to want to put these types of players in a bottom-six role, even when their skills are more in-line with a scoring role, which obviously they have played their entire careers to that point.

Put them in a checking role in your NHL lineup and they might not excel at it, but give them a chance at the top of the lineup or otherwise with skilled offensive talent and you might find a gem. That’s the hope with Weal, and we saw flashes of it late last season. Cote alluded to it.

“Right from the start of last year, he was on a mission,” Cote said. “He just racked up the points. He still finished in the top-15 in scoring [in the AHL], he only played three-quarters of the year. I was happy to see him go [up to the NHL], hurt losing him obviously. But I think he’s one of those guys if you give him an opportunity, you give him ice time and play him with good players, I think he’s going to surprise a lot of people how good he can actually be.

“A guy like that, you can’t not play a guy like that. If he’s on your roster, you play the damn guy, because he is that good. He’s almost like [Shayne Gostisbehere] when he came up with the Flyers. He actually has the ability to change games. So dynamic, full of energy, competes like a bastard.

“I would even say he competes at a much higher level than Ghost does, so he’s a guy that needs to play on the top two lines, you need to play this guy.”

That’s a strong endorsement of Jordan Weal from a guy who spent most of two seasons coaching him, and it should bode well for Weal’s chances of playing an important role on the 2017-18 Flyers.


A conversation with Riley Cote with the BSH Radio crew

Posted by Broad Street Hockey: For Philadelphia Flyers Fans on Monday, July 10, 2017




[#] Tue Jul 11 2017 22:14:28 EDT from rss

Subject: Scott Laughton signs two-year, $1.925 million extension

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With the largest pieces of offseason business out of the way, Ron Hextall moves to lock up a young RFA.

Ever since the Flyers’ season came to a close, general manager Ron Hextall has been slowly but surely resolving every major open piece of free agent business.

First, he made sure that prospects Mikhail Vorobyev and Oskar Lindblom took their talents to North America. Then, he locked up restricted free agent Shayne Gostisbehere to a six-year contract extension. Finally, in the lead-up to free agency, he found a way to retain Jordan Weal, and answered the goaltending question by signing Brian Elliott to a two-year contract.

That left Hextall with only a few more necessary moves before the offseason would essentially come to a close for the organization. Specifically, there were five restricted free agents remaining that received qualifying offers who had yet to be locked up by the Flyers: Scott Laughton, Anthony Stolarz, Alex Lyon, Taylor Leier and Cole Bardreau. Now, that list can be cut down to four.

The Flyers announced late this afternoon that they had re-signed Laughton to a two-year extension. Shortly thereafter, Dave Isaac reported the terms, which came out to an average annual value (cap hit) of $962,500.

This contract buys out two RFA years, but the team will still have one more year of restricted free agency control after this deal expires. Still, Laughton’s spot as a part of the Flyers’ future is far from secure. He played merely two NHL games during the 2016-17 season, spending most of the year in Lehigh Valley with the AHL Phantoms. That’s the track record of a player who doesn’t seem like a sure thing to make the Flyers in October.

However, despite his treatment last season, Ron Hextall and the Flyers seem relatively satisfied with Laughton’s recent development. Hextall chose to utilize an expansion draft protection slot on him rather than on veterans who received more prominent roles at the NHL level last year, such as Michael Raffl or Pierre-Edouard Bellemare. In addition, the Flyers have praised Laughton’s effort in the AHL, noting that he was used exclusively in a defensive role to better prepare him for that job at the NHL level, and he more than met expectations.

On BSH Radio Monday night, former Phantoms assistant coach Riley Cote echoed that sentiment, noting Laughton had struggled to adapt to a bottom-six role in his past NHL stints, but benefited from his time in the minors last season.

I think he just suffers from an identity crisis. I think he’s been an offensive guy his whole junior career, he’s been the “lean-on” guy, I think he had a hard time adjusting to a lesser role, [lines] three or four, you know what I mean? I think what he’s learned coming back down is that... he didn’t play on the power play, he didn’t play in offensive situations like that, so I think he’s able to absorb more of what he really, truly is.

It’s not a knock on his ability. But once you get to the NHL, there’s so many unbelievable talents, so you have to take a lesser role sometimes. I think for him, he’s a third line center probably max on a good team. But I think he has to buy into that role, because there’s a lot of responsibility that comes with that role. I think he needs to be just a little bit more gritty, maybe cut his losses a little bit more. I think he hangs onto the puck too much and gets into trouble, turns pucks over, and so he doesn’t have to carry the puck as much.

I think he works hard enough, gets on the puck hard enough, I think he just... we talked about it all the time: “Simplify his game.” Be a hard worker, be a reliable centerman, win faceoffs, kill penalties. There’s nothing wrong with that. There’s some guys — and I think he had an identity crisis — it’s hard to swallow when you’re a 90-point guy, almost 100-point guy in juniors. You think you’re just gonna hop right into the NHL and be an 80-point guy in the NHL, and it’s just not realistic. Tagging him [like that] before he made the Flyers... well, he made the Flyers, came back to the Phantoms, made the Flyers again, came back to the Phantoms again, I think it really just crushed his confidence. I think he just needs to come back in training camp and earn a job and just mean business. I think he has to have that attitude.

Laughton is no longer waiver-exempt, meaning that if the Flyers want to send him back to Lehigh Valley next year, he will be required to pass through waivers, giving every team in the NHL a chance to scoop up his contract without providing any compensation to Philadelphia. As a result, it seems likely that Laughton will make the Flyers’ roster to begin the 2017-18 season, considering the fact that the organization deemed him valuable enough to protect in the expansion draft less than a month ago.

Still, that does not guarantee Laughton an everyday spot in the lineup. If he has a middling camp come September, it’s easy to see the 23-year old sitting in the press box and waiting for an injury to open a spot for him on the ice. On the other hand, if Laughton builds off his solid AHL year, it’s not impossible to envision him as the starting fourth line center to begin the 2017-18 season.

Laughton has shown flashes of usefulness at the NHL level (1.88 Points/60 at 5v5 during the 2015-16 season) and looked especially dangerous at wing late that year, but it seems like the organization views him primarily as a center at the moment. Right now, it looks like he’ll be in a battle with Jori Lehtera and Mike Vecchione for that 4C slot on opening night, and it will be up to Laughton to impress his coaches and win the job.





[#] Wed Jul 12 2017 07:00:01 EDT from rss

Subject: Wednesday Morning Fly By: Beach day!

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Today's open discussion thread, complete with your daily dose of Philadelphia Flyers news and notes...

*Heyooooooo beach day! Anyone heading to stone Harbor for today's Trial on the Isle? If so, in case you missed it, here's a full schedule of today's events. [BSH]

*We were lucky enough to have former Flyer and Phantoms assistant coach Riley Cote on BSH Radio this week and he's a great interview. Some really interesting stuff here if you haven't listened yet. [BSH]

*The most interesting stuff Cote had to say was regarding Jordan Weal. [BSH]

*Morgan Frost has impressed so far in camp, and models his game a little after some of his favorite athletes in a completely different sport. [Inquirer]

*Carter Hart is jut a kid, but he's already got the mindset of a pro, which is pretty incredible. [CSN Philly]

*Did you know Mike Vecchione comes from a family of bodybuilders? That's kinda interesting. [Daily News]

*Was a big day yesterday for former Flyers, as our old pal Rick Tocchet was named head coach of the Arizona Coyotes... [Coyotes]

*...and Mark Recchi was then named to Tocc's old spot as an assistant in Pittsburgh. Bunch of turncoats these guys! [Penguins]





[#] Thu Jul 13 2017 07:00:02 EDT from rss

Subject: Thursday Morning Fly By: Oh god life is boring again.

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Today's open discussion thread, complete with your daily dose of Philadelphia Flyers news and notes...

*Development camp is over so we are back to the dark hockey-less dregs of summertime. The only thing that can sustain you is the weekly episode of BSH Radio. Have you listened yet to this week's? The Riley Cote interview is suuuuuper good. [BSH]

*Here's another full rundown of the dev camp happenings in case you missed some stuff. [Philly Is Flyer]

*At some point, we're going to have both Felix Sandstrom and Carter Hart on this hockey team. That is going to be so freaking fun. [CSN Philly]

*The Flyers improved a lot this summer by doing absolutely nothing, but here are four teams that improved a lot by doing actual stuff. [Sportsnet]

*It seems like every time a Russian decides to leave the NHL, they say it's because of the Olympics. I really think this is going to be a problem for the league. [SB Nation]

*Looks like our old pal Mark Streit has found himself a new home. That's really nice. [Habs Eyes On The Prize]

*And finally, it's pretty rare these days for a player to play his entire career with one team. DGB looks at which guys might end up in the one-franchise club. [Sportsnet]





[#] Thu Jul 13 2017 10:00:02 EDT from rss

Subject: Top 10 hardest hit photos from the 2016-2017 season

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A special Flyers Frese Frame season recap gallery





[#] Thu Jul 13 2017 13:00:04 EDT from rss

Subject: Top 10 photos from development camp

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A special Flyers Frese Frame feature

Scroll through Kate Frese’s photos from this year’s development camp. To see more, CLICK HERE.





[#] Thu Jul 13 2017 21:40:07 EDT from rss

Subject: Taylor Leier re-signed to one-year extension

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Ron Hextall locks up another of his restricted free agents.

When Scott Laughton agreed to a two-year extension on Tuesday night, that left Flyers general manager Ron Hextall with just four remaining restricted free agents to sign.

Cut that list down to three.

Forward Taylor Leier agreed to terms with the Flyers on Thursday night, per Renaud Lavoie of the Montreal Journal. According to Lavoie, it’s a one-year deal worth $807,000 million at the NHL level. CapFriendly later confirmed the signing, noting that Leier had accepted his qualifying offer.

Leier spent the bulk of his 2016-17 season with the Lehigh Valley Phantoms of the AHL, finishing with 37 points (13 goals, 24 assists) in 48 games. It was his most efficient scoring season yet as a professional.

The contract is two-way, meaning that Leier will receive less in terms of actual compensation if he does not spend the entire year with the Flyers. And despite his solid AHL performance in 2016-17, Leier making the big club out of camp seems like a longshot. With Nolan Patrick and Oskar Lindblom both expected to make strong pushes for spots in the opening night lineup, the result is a roster crunch with 16 forwards battling for 14 spots.

Leier does have NHL experience, skating in 10 games last season and six games back in 2015-16. But the point production (one goal, one assist) and play-driving (42.2% Corsi For at 5v5) hasn’t manifested itself at the NHL level as of yet.

Leier is no longer waiver-exempt, so if the Flyers try to send him to the minors at the end of camp, he will have to be exposed to every other team in the league. However, it seems unlikely another club would claim Leier in that situation, considering the large amount of players going through waivers at that time, and the fact that the claiming team would be forced to keep Leier up with them despite the 23-year old having yet to prove he is an NHL-caliber player.

That being said, the Flyers’ organization does seem to like Leier. Riley Cote, an assistant coach with the Lehigh Valley Phantoms up until just a few weeks ago, lauded Leier in his interview with BSH Radio on Monday night.

I know [Leier’s] had his little stints [in the NHL] and people know who he is, but as far as a quality human being, a quality worker, “gets it,” a pro — he’ll find his way for sure, whether it’s the Flyers or someone else. Surely he will.

Most likely, Leier will begin next season back with the Phantoms, but expect him to be one of the first call-ups once the injury bug hits. He’ll have his chance at some point in the coming months to prove that he’s an NHL player.





[#] Fri Jul 14 2017 07:00:02 EDT from rss

Subject: Friday Morning Fly By: IT IS HOT.

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Today's open discussion thread, complete with your daily dose of Philadelphia Flyers news and notes...

*But you know what's cool? Ron locked Taylor Leier down! [BSH]

*Thank god for Kate, who snapped a ton of awesome pictures at camp this week which will help to tide us over on this hot July Friday. [BSH]

*She's also put together a gallery of the ten hardest hits from this past season of Flyers hockey and they're freaking awesome. [BSH]

*Nolan Patrick is looking to get back onto the ice, which is awesome. [Inquirer]

*Travis Sanhem takes us inside the fun from Wednesday's Trial on the Isle. [CSN Philly]

*The Flyers were dead middle when it came to teams who take the most penalties. Not bad! [ProHockeyTalk]

*Friedman's final 30 Thoughts of the year focuses on the summer trade market. [Sportsnet]

*Speaking of trades, there are Phil Kessel trade rumors floating around. Which, given Pittsburgh's moves so far this offseason, is not totally unbelievable. [Puck Daddy]

*Have you noticed that a lot of these new contracts being handed out have giant signing bonuses? Hmm wonder what that is about... [TSN]

*...oh, it's a lockout. The league is absolutely going to lock out again in 2020. Gary Bettman, ladies and gentlemen! [The National Post]





[#] Fri Jul 14 2017 10:30:02 EDT from rss

Subject: BSH Story Time: How a 1998 5th round pick turned into Sean Couturier

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Chris Gratton turned into Sean Couturier. That’s magic, folks.

With development camp in the rear view mirror and the start of the preseason way, way too far ahead of us, it feels like a good time to take a little stroll down Flyers memory lane. Have a seat, get comfy, and join us on the journey from late-round pick to shutdown center.

It was February 5, 1998 and the Flyers were gearing up for another playoff run after being swept by Detroit in the Stanley Cup Finals the prior season. GM Bob Clarke decided to bring in a veteran presence and the Flyers sent a 5th round selection in the 1998 NHL draft to Vancouver for Mike Sillinger.

But that wasn’t enough, and the Flyers were kicked out of the 1998 playoffs in only five games by Dominik Hašek and the Sabres.

Despite his hot start with the team, Mike Sillinger did not last long in Philadelphia. 25 games into 1998-99 season, he and Chris Gratton were shipped off to Tampa Bay in exchange for Mikael Renberg and Daymond Langkow. Daymond Langkow did well in Philadelphia, scoring 23, 50, and 54 points in his three seasons with the Flyers. In the 2001 off-season, the Flyers did what they did best: brought in a star player who was on the back nine of his career with the signing of Jeremy Roenick (JR was still productive though, so we’ll give them a pass). This left no spot on the team for Langkow, who was shipped off to the Phoenix Coyotes in exchange for a 2002 second round pick and a 2003 first round pick. The second rounder was used to move up to the fourth overall selection where the Flyers selected Joni Pitkanen.

The Coyotes, who finished second in their division during their 2001-02 campaign, were not able to build off that success and finished their 2002-03 season second from the bottom in the Pacific Division with a record of 31-35-11-5. Their first round draft pick, which they dealt to the Flyers, fell to the 11th overall selection.

With the 11th overall pick, the Flyers drafted Jeff Carter, a core member of the team for the better part of six seasons. Carter was essential post-lockout rebuild. He was a key member in the 2007-08 run to the Eastern Conference Finals and was one of the team’s best goal scorers throughout the late 2000’s.

Nashville Predators v Philadelphia Flyers Photo by Paul Bereswill/Getty Images

Flyers GM Paul Holmgren made arguably the biggest moves of his career with the Flyers on June 23, 2011, when he shocked the entire city of Philadelphia by trading captain Mike Richards to the Los Angeles Kings and sending leading goal scorer Carter to the Columbus Blue Jackets. Fans were up in arms, wondering what had just happened. In return for Carter they received Jake Voracek, the eighth overall pick in the 2011 draft, and a third round pick in 2011.

With the eighth pick the Flyers drafted center Sean Couturier and that, my friends, is where our story concludes. The story of how a fifth round pick turned into Sean Couturier.





[#] Sat Jul 15 2017 21:32:55 EDT from rss

Subject: Flyers sign remaining RFA

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Stolarz & Lyon ink 1 year deals, Bardreau back for 2 more.

At the start of today the Flyers had three remaining RFA’s left to sign, that number can now be cut down to zero. Alex Lyon, Anthony Stolarz and Cole Bardreau have all agree to contracts with the team.

Stolarz and Lyon, who both saw action with the Lehigh Valley Phantoms have both signed one year, two-way deals. (Details on money are not available at this time.) Lyon spent the majority of the season as the Phantoms starter playing in 47 games, winning 27 of the contests. He posted a 2.74 GAA and .912 SV%. With his first pro season under his belt, Lyon will look once again to take the reigns of the Phantoms and lead them to their first back-to-back playoff appearances since the team last did so in 07/08-08/09. In a crowded pool of goalie prospects, it will be tough for Lyon to truly stand out, but don’t write him off.

It is important to note that with both goalies signing one year deals, this opens up the possibility of Felix Sandstrom coming over from Sweden next season. Also Carter Hart will be able to join the AHL squad next year, having finished up his junior career with the Everett Silvertips.

Stolarz spit time between the Phantoms and Flyers last season, and many thought he could see solid NHL time next season, however with the Flyers signing Brian Elliott it does not look like there will be room for Stolarz. In an event where Michael Neuvirth or Elliott goes down with an injury, look for Stolarz to be called up to the NHL.

In Stolarz’s limited NHL time last season he played very well, including a shutout against the Calgary Flames. While he is still very young at 23 years of age, Stolarz has been passed by a number of goalies drafted under him, most notably Matt Murray and Joonas Korpisalo. He’ll be looking to take advantage of any NHL chance he is given.

The Flyers signed Cole Bardreau out of Cornell University back in March of 2015 and he has spent the last three seasons with the Lehigh Valley Phantoms. Bardreau has battled injures through his collegiate career and pro career, but that did not stop him from appearing in 72 games last season for the Phantoms, registering 9 goals and 24 points. He is a key member of the Phantoms bottom-six, and while he might not be a flashy name, players such as Bardreau still prove to be valuable to teams through and through.

As per Dave Isaac, Bardreau will earn $650,000 at the NHL level, and $100,000 in the AHL. The second season he’ll earn $125,000 at the AHL level.





[#] Sun Jul 16 2017 14:37:45 EDT from rss

Subject: Nolan Patrick knows Claude Giroux better as

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Turns out the hockey world is pretty small. Shocking.

Just a week ago, we heard from Nolan Patrick about how he met Claude Giroux, and it was long before he was even a twinkle in Ron Hextall’s eye. He was fourteen years old, and the circumstances were a little different: he was calling Claude “coach” instead of “captain.”

Back in 2013, Nolan Patrick was one of 42 bantam-aged players to be selected to attend NHLPA’s Allstate All-Canadians mentorship camp, a five-day course with appearances by NHL veterans, all-star players, and coaches. Claude Giroux was among the players invited to coach at the camp, and he coached Nolan Patrick personally.

Curious about Claude’s future as a hockey coach? “Well, we lost,” is all Nolan would say when asked. Oh well.

Coach Claude

A post shared by Ryanne Breton (@ryannehaileyb) on

Look at those rosy cheeks right in the center of the frame! It’s like he knew.

Claude must’ve liked Nolan enough to pick him for his team, right? Maybe he doesn’t have a future as a coach, but looks like his scouting skills aren’t half-bad. I feel like this has to be bode well for us. It’s some positive energy. Good mojo. I’m feeling it.

Not totally related, but let’s hope Claude’s gotten better at selfies over the years. I’d like to see a recreation of this one.





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