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[#] Wed Feb 03 2010 08:57:42 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

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Thanks for the information.

I'll have to pester Toad.Net about it.

[#] Wed Feb 03 2010 14:44:28 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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(Get it? The address is four times as long, so there are four times


Very cute. Obviously not designed by unix people, they would have spared themselves the extra typing.

[#] Wed Feb 03 2010 14:44:54 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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record. The idea is that someday the A records and associated IPv4
records will simply go away.

HA! Not in our lifetime.

[#] Wed Feb 03 2010 23:50:24 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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It's gonna get nasty. People will want IPv4 long after there aren't any more addresses to go around. There will be unauthorized trafficking of addresses, lawsuits being flung around everywhere ... real bad juju all over.


And I'm going to have to get even more nasty with people who think that all the world's a /24 and they deserve to have one just because they asked for it.

[#] Thu Feb 04 2010 15:16:00 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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heh, maybe when people ask you for a /24 you can say... oh you just want a

set of 16 addresses? Then give them a tiny little 16 address block of something in ipv6. Then when they try and plug their toaster and their washing machine and their fridge into it, and they run out of addresses, that'll be their problem.

[#] Thu Feb 04 2010 15:18:16 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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...except that a /24 in IPv6 is 20282409603651670423947251286016 addresses.
:)

[#] Thu Feb 04 2010 16:06:55 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

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*imagines IG dragging his knuckles across the numeric keypad a few times*

[#] Thu Feb 04 2010 17:27:27 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Heh. I'm sure Ford was actually thinking of a /120, which is the same number of hosts as an IPv4 /24 (256 hosts).

The standard recommended practice is to make every network a /64, which provides enough room for 18446744073709551616 hosts. Most ISP's (including us) are being allocated /32's, which provides enough room for 4294967296 of those /64 networks.

In other words...

The IPv6 address space is big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to the IPv6 address space.

[#] Fri Feb 05 2010 15:32:34 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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...except that a /24 in IPv6 is 20282409603651670423947251286016
addresses. :)

What I was getting at is /24 is all but 8 bits, so give all but 8 bits in ipv6.

[#] Sat Feb 06 2010 10:29:35 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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The reason people ask for /24's is because their little minds can only think on octet boundaries. They want "everything to the right of the third dot" to be their network. ARIN calls this "administrative convenience" and specifically names it as a NOT LEGITIMATE justification.

Some people will then attempt to deliberately falsify their justification docs, at which point a flame war with someone like me usually ensues. I'm managing the address space for a smaller ISP, and when the IPv4 address space runs out, we're SCREWED. It's only going to get worse.

[#] Mon Feb 08 2010 16:32:11 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Aha! I just IPv6 enabled our userland network. I realized that I don't really need to configure a proper firewall, since we're not doing NAT. A simple "everything out, nothing in" ACL on the subinterface of the router does just fine.

I see the dancing turtle. :)

[#] Mon Feb 08 2010 17:04:25 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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You know what the problem is, just occurred to me. ipv6 is a solution to a problem nobody actually has.
If all the people working ipv6 spent their time effort and money devising a spam free email internet system, they could have solved a problem that plagues lots of internet users and uses up lots of real bandwidth.
Imagine that, solving a real problem. That was probably too hard, so they did the ipv6 thing.

[#] Mon Feb 08 2010 17:09:39 EST from skpacman @ Uncensored

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What usually causes hardware to report a MAC address of all 0's to a dhcp server? hardware or firmware error? i was sorely confused today since my pc did that while i was remoting to it via VNC... checked the router dhcp report and it says it switched the mac to all 0's for some reason...

 

weirdness...



[#] Mon Feb 08 2010 21:46:16 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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IPv6 is a solution to a problem *everyone* has. The IPv4 address space is running out. Depletion is about two years away. Then what? The Internet stops growing?

Will you like it when your Internet connection is behind three levels of NAT and you have absolutely no way to punch through to receive connections?
Will you shrug it off when the regional ISP who provided you with a free tunnel to a static IP has to cancel that service in order to free up every last IPv4 address? Will you enjoy paying $50/month for a web site because public addresses are so scarce?

The problem with the IPv6 migration isn't that it doesn't need to be done, but rather that no one wants to spend the time and money to be among the first to migrate when it doesn't provide an immediate benefit. It's pretty clear that we're going to have to do this in fire drill mode.

[#] Mon Feb 08 2010 23:03:58 EST from the8088er @ Uncensored

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How do I set up ipv6 for my own personal use? Do I need to call AT&T (my ISP)?

[#] Mon Feb 08 2010 23:46:47 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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You have to either get the service from your ISP, or tunnel through IPv4 to a remote IPv6 network somewhere.

[#] Tue Feb 09 2010 04:23:35 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

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Mo Feb 08 2010 21:46:16 EST von IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored
IPv6 is a solution to a problem *everyone* has. The IPv4 address space is running out. Depletion is about two years away. Then what? The Internet stops growing?

Will you like it when your Internet connection is behind three levels of NAT and you have absolutely no way to punch through to receive connections? Will you shrug it off when the regional ISP who provided you with a free tunnel to a static IP has to cancel that service in order to free up every last IPv4 address? Will you enjoy paying $50/month for a web site because public addresses are so scarce?

The problem with the IPv6 migration isn't that it doesn't need to be done, but rather that no one wants to spend the time and money to be among the first to migrate when it doesn't provide an immediate benefit. It's pretty clear that we're going to have to do this in fire drill mode.

well, so the citadel ipv6 enabling got a strong supporter now? ;-P



[#] Tue Feb 09 2010 07:53:02 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Sure, now that I *have* IPv6 I can start writing the code to handle it.

[#] Wed Feb 10 2010 20:14:54 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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IPv6 is a solution to a problem *everyone* has. The IPv4 address space

is running out. Depletion is about two years away. Then what? The
Internet stops growing?

A problem 2 years from now is not a problem like spam is a problem now.

When the oil starts to run out will the oil companies go away? No they will have worked out another solution.
ipv6 may be that solution, but I have a feeling there are easier things.


It just seems odd to me... it's like the space station, so many resources poured into a solution that doesn't have a pressing problem requiring it.

[#] Wed Feb 10 2010 20:19:20 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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Will you like it when your Internet connection is behind three levels

of NAT and you have absolutely no way to punch through to receive
connections? Will you shrug it off when the regional ISP who provided

you with a free tunnel to a static IP has to cancel that service in
order to free up every last IPv4 address? Will you enjoy paying
$50/month for a web site because public addresses are so scarce?

no, yes (it hasn't been working lately anyway) no, I'll stop doing it.
Only the real die hards will have their own servers.
I see why you take the stance you do, you're a lot closer to the problem than the rest of us, and it also happens to be your job, but it still seems to me there's a lot more pressing problems
For example, how much do you pay for bandwidth? (I mean your company.) If you only actually had to push less than 40% of the data you do now wouldn't you save a lot of money on bandwith and service upgrades to keep up/
?
Why not get rid of spam first. That problem will yield real results RIGHT NOW, whereas ipv6 MIGHT yield results later.
I guess it itches the same place that climate change does. al gore is a solution to a problem that (depending on your point of view) we either don't haev or can't do anything about.
Thus, I have a hard tiem getting excited about anything gore has to say or ipv6.

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