Language:
switch to room list switch to menu My folders
Go to page: First ... 54 55 56 57 [58] 59 60 61 62 ... Last
[#] Fri Jan 07 2011 10:30:20 EST from Sig @ Uncensored

Subject: Re:

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

It's hard for us because our IT department is particularly bad.  I used to contract for the Navy and I always believed that was the worst IT environment I'd ever seen, but this trumps it.  A few examples that spring to mind:

-CD-burners and USB storage devices are disabled.  You have no way to get files off the network to a soldier other than e-mailing them BUT

-Massive restrictions on what file formats you can e-mail (which I would actually support, except for point the first)

-100 MB e-mail account limit.  I can burn through this in about 3 days.  I make copious use of personal folder storage, but that's not an option for soldiers who don't have their own computer (e.g. 95% of them), in part because

-No network personal shares.  I can browse to a spot on the file server where I can save things, but there is no share that is "mine" and no file security whatsoever.  I don't have permissions to modify the security of my own files on the network.  Since I deal heavily in personnel and pay (and occasionally health) information, this is horrifying on a number of levels.  An officer outside my company didn't see why this was an issue; I did a quick search and showed him his last few evals.

-Every e-mail to the helpdesk distro (what THEY tell you to do) generates a new ticket in their tracking system, creating so much junk and noise that they rarely find or address the actual help requests.  After the third time that my ticket was closed 3 months later without any action at all, I stopped trying to use that method.  I did request through other channels an additional network drop in one of my offices.  They sent out a contractor who did a bang-up job doing the physical installation, and then closed the ticket without actually hooking it up to anything.  When I sent a (polite, really) request to find out what else I needed to do to make it work, they threatened to blacklist me from support.  I refrained from pointing out that we would likely never know the difference.

-I had a network printer/scanner sitting in my office for 4 months.  They never hooked it up, and eventually took it back for deployment elsewhere.

-No user data backups.  Really.

-DAR encryption.  The contents of my hard drive are constantly being checked and encrypted using a certificate on my common access card.  This is good, I guess.  If I lose my CAC for whatever reason, the files are unrecoverable.  They will revoke the certificates, issue me a new card, and presumably a new laptop because whatever was on the old one is inaccessible.  They sent out instructions on how to manually (and very temporarily) decrypt files prior to getting a new CAC; they never addressed what happens if you lose one.

-If a machine is off the network for more than a few weeks, it's removed from active directory.  If it's new enough, they will nuke/pave it with the latest desktop image, else you just turn it in and hope they might give you a new one some day.  We are down to one general use computer (a WinXP P4) for the 50+ soldiers who come in each month.  It was disconnected 4 months ago for some reason IT was unable to determine.  We've been trying for that entire time to get a bunch of the 1SG's files off it, including dozens of NCO evaluations from the last few years, without so much as even a response from IT.  (To keep this vaguely on topic: yesterday I wiped the local admin password with a Linux-based recovery tool on USB and grabbed the files.  Too easy.)

-Because of the lack of computers, most soldiers in my unit no longer have accounts on the network.  You have to log in to a computer on the network (not just the Outlook Web Acccess or SharePoint) at least once every 30 days or it gets disabled.  Even if we had computers for them to log on to from time to time, we aren't necessarily in the office every month, nor do we drill on the same weekend every month.  Rather than modify this policy to make it fit reality for a one-weekend-a-month organization, they have just stopped giving computer accounts to soldiers who aren't full-time (e.g. 90% of them, including most of the commanders and senior NCOs).

OK, that was more than a few.  But that was just what I could think of off the top of my head.

 

 

Fri Jan 07 2011 07:38:52 AM EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

The army used to embrace unix-like systems, as I recall.  But I guess they like going with what feels familiar, and Windows is pretty familiar to a lot of the officers and such.  It's just awful.



 



[#] Wed Jan 12 2011 00:06:14 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

Subject: Re:

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Good enough for government work?

I would imagine the status quo has to change first.

[#] Wed Jan 12 2011 07:57:51 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

That's a spectacularly awful IT department, possibly informed not by anyone who actually knows how to run an IT department, but some butterbar who wants to prove something (and is failing at it).



[#] Wed Jan 12 2011 17:13:52 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

on my dime.

[#] Thu Jan 13 2011 23:13:39 EST from Sig @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

I brought my work laptop with me to some training at Camp Murray (the state HQ) only to discover that the web app on which we were being trained required JInitiator or something that I didn't have.  About 20 of us had this issue; they sent us across the street to the IT directorate to get it fixed and continued the class.

Now, it's been a few years since I did desktop support--OK, it was 2003.  But if I'm working the desk and 30 soldiers suddenly walk in with identical problems, the new primary mission of everyone present has just become to identify a solution and apply it 30 times and get these people out of the nice quiet workspace.  Instead, I watched as one harried person applied the fix 20 times.  One very slow-moving sergeant wandered over and inquired whether I was there for something different.  He nodded glumly when I described the problem.  "Yeah, I don't know how to do that, sorry."  Then he went back to puttering aimlessly about the office.  I wanted to choke him out.  How about watching the one person do it, maybe take some notes, and then start helping people?  That's a good, safe course of action that would a) help you learn something new and b) get people out of your office a little faster.

The entire concept of customer service seems foreign to these people.  You can tell that they are only competing for their positions with other soldiers of similar backgrounds.  I'd wager not a one of them has ever had to compete in the Seattle-area IT contractor market.



[#] Fri Jan 14 2011 10:28:56 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

If I remember the general attitude correctly, most of them don't really want to do anything anyway.  So it's easier to not learn what needs to be done to resolve the problem.

It isn't about service.  It's about the paycheck.  And the paycheck is going to happen regardless of the service.  There are no consequences for bad service.



[#] Fri Jan 14 2011 11:18:42 EST from Sig @ Uncensored

Subject: Re:

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Bingo.

Fri Jan 14 2011 10:28:56 AM EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

There are no consequences for bad service.



 



[#] Fri Jan 14 2011 11:36:45 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

I should adjust that.

There are no consequences for bad service delivered to most people.  You do have consequences for bad service delivered to certain commanders... terrible consequences that could include paycheck, but mostly the amount of free time you have for your own.



[#] Sat Jan 15 2011 17:41:56 EST from Sig @ Uncensored

Subject: Re:

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

It takes a lot more than being incompetent to find yourself unemployed in this organization.

That does raise a valid point, however.  My full time boss, the battalion XO (a major), has only nice things to say about their customer service.  I suspect it is similar for other field grade officers.

When I worked for the Navy as a contractor, I remember an occasion where I was pulled off a "entire office is unable to print" ticket to go set up the base commander's Blackberry.  He wasn't even in that morning, but his secretary insisted that it be done before he arrived.

Fri Jan 14 2011 11:36:45 AM EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

I should adjust that.

There are no consequences for bad service delivered to most people.  You do have consequences for bad service delivered to certain commanders... terrible consequences that could include paycheck, but mostly the amount of free time you have for your own.



 



[#] Sun Jan 16 2011 08:07:51 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

Yep, that's the military I remember.



[#] Mon Jan 17 2011 12:25:51 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

The entire concept of customer service seems foreign to these people.
 You can tell that they are only competing for their positions with
other soldiers of similar backgrounds.  I'd wager not a one of them
has ever had to compete in the Seattle-area IT contractor market.

And that's what people say is wrong with monopolies. The army is a monopoly.

[#] Mon Jan 17 2011 12:26:17 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

It isn't about service.  It's about the paycheck.  And the paycheck
is going to happen regardless of the service.  There are no
consequences for bad service.

Amen. I like movies about this kind of thing. Makes me laugh.

[#] Mon Jan 17 2011 12:27:33 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

Subject: Re:

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

where I was pulled off a "entire office is unable to print" ticket to
go set up the base commander's Blackberry.  He wasn't even in that
morning, but his secretary insisted that it be done before he
arrived.

OOOHHHH MAKE A MOVIE MAKE A MOVIE!!!

[#] Tue Jan 18 2011 10:29:59 EST from saltine @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

I use openvz inside a vobx hosting linux inside macosx and the performance is fairly good.

[#] Wed Jan 19 2011 15:42:47 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

I use openvz inside a vobx hosting linux inside macosx and the
performance is fairly good.

I disbelieve.

[#] Thu Jan 27 2011 03:17:00 EST from saltine @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

On a mac Mini, even.
The only snafu is that I can only use one core, with two cores the clocks go rogue and Linux wedges.

[#] Thu Jan 27 2011 20:18:02 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

I would imagine the biggest snafu would be the limited memory.

[#] Thu Jan 27 2011 20:34:14 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

If it's on a mac mini then the issue is you're already used to poor performance ;-)

[#] Tue Feb 01 2011 22:16:47 EST from Harbard @ Uncensored

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

i am looking for a quick and dirty web
server. one that i can set up with little or
no configuration. i want to only have a
couple of pages of static information. any
suggestions?

[#] Wed Feb 02 2011 06:26:18 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

Subject: Re:

[Reply] [ReplyQuoted] [Headers] [Print]

nginx? apache?...



Go to page: First ... 54 55 56 57 [58] 59 60 61 62 ... Last