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[#] Wed Dec 16 2009 11:13:58 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Red Hat and Canonical together could probably wrest control of the kernel away from Linus for any reason, based on momentum alone. In fact, Linus said a long time ago that not only is this inevitable, but that he's ok with being succeeded when the community decides that it's time to move on.

[#] Wed Dec 16 2009 15:18:11 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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yeah, but when the moment comes...

[#] Wed Dec 16 2009 17:20:09 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

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Mi Dez 16 2009 11:13:58 EST von IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored
Red Hat and Canonical together could probably wrest control of the kernel away from Linus for any reason, based on momentum alone. In fact, Linus said a long time ago that not only is this inevitable, but that he's ok with being succeeded when the community decides that it's time to move on.


in fact... Remember the Big thing with Greg Kroah Hartman and second tier distros ala centos or ubuntu? They don't contribute.

And he put numbers under it after Canonical crying out loud that this would be unfair.

Canonical is Way behind the list of private persons contriuting to the linux kernel. (and patches by the debian communities)

so while redhat might, canonical won't. Never ever. They get along with their stuff. hardly as their release quality shows.

Ubuntu is just playing catch up with debian in anything else then whats directly with user impact. And they don't do a good job at it (if you have a look at which citadel version they carry; and they only needed to take care about whats happening in debian with the packages the pkg-citadel team produces.)



[#] Wed Dec 23 2009 12:34:36 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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Today I discovered that when my audio gets choppy for no good reason, I can kill pulseaudio and restart it and it starts working well again.

in case anybody else has this problem.

[#] Wed Dec 23 2009 13:11:08 EST from cellofellow @ Uncensored

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My audio sounds like crap but that's just because a couple of months ago
I mistakenly played a lot of pure tones at once very loudly and it
blew out the speakers. Be careful when mixing "motion" (a security camera
tool) with paplay. The idea of a security alarm may sound cool but it just
may blow out your laptops speakers. Should have used beep instead but it
doesn't work for some reason.

[#] Wed Dec 23 2009 13:43:25 EST from kinetix @ ColabX

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FordII: This wouldn't happen to be pulse in karmic, would it?
BTW, I recently upgraded two kubuntu systems and two mythbuntu boxes to karmic.
Only one upgrade was slightly less than acidic bile spewing. The
mythbuntu devs need to get some work done so that those of us who pretend mythbuntu is to be used in a media center case ((and not have a keyboard/mouse attached, silly me!) don't have to answer questions during an upgrade, and that the hardware that's on the box continues to function exactly as it did before the upgrade. Is it really that difficult to have lirc working after an upgrade of a distro based around mythtv?
*sigh* However, I did heed the vmware advice and migrated things to virtualbox prior to upgrading systems that had vmware on them. Virtualbox is now my new best friend. What a great piece of software - don't think I'll be using vmware again for personal use any time soon.

[#] Wed Dec 23 2009 14:55:12 EST from skpacman @ Uncensored

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Wed Dec 23 2009 12:34:36 PM EST from Ford II @ Uncensored
Today I discovered that when my audio gets choppy for no good reason, I can kill pulseaudio and restart it and it starts working well again.

in case anybody else has this problem.


same happens on mine. seems only when my system is under load that it gets choppy. when my system is under heavy-moderate load i restart pulseaudio and works fine under heavy-moderate load. doesnt happen when the only thing running is my audio app.

dont know what causes it, but at least i know how to fix it.



[#] Wed Dec 23 2009 20:55:26 EST from Harbard @ Uncensored

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Ford,

I had this issue too.  I improved the situation thusly:

 

Q. PulseAudio is working correctly, but I am noticing some stuttering on my system. Is there anything I can do to help?
A. Edit the file /etc/pulse/daemon.conf:

Code:
$ gksudo gedit /etc/pulse/daemon.conf

Find the following lines (usually at the bottom):

Code:
default-fragments = 8
default-fragment-size-msec = 10

Try experimenting with different values for both of these entries. I can't tell you what values are optimal for your system, as each sound card has different buffer sizes and characteristics - therefore you'll need to use trial & error. The default fragment amount and size used by an untweaked PulseAudio installation is 4 and 25, respectively.

Note 1: you must restart pulseaudio for any configuration changes to take effect.
Note 2: If your system was stuttering in versions of Ubuntu prior to Hardy, then you could be suffering from an ALSA kernel issue - these instructions probably won't help.

 

(from ubuntuforums.org; HOWTO: PulseAudio Fixes & System-Wide Equalizer Support)

 

This only improved the situation most of the time.  The best solution I found was to switch to Fedora 11.  Better sound support.  This of course raised other issues bt at least the sound was fixed.



[#] Wed Dec 23 2009 21:17:14 EST from cellofellow @ Uncensored

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Other things I've done to get better PulseAudio performance is run it in high-priority and realtime modes, though to get high-priority (negative nice) working requires editting your PAM limits, and realtime requires a real-time kernel.

I haven't needed to do it that way lately, which is good.

-Josh

[#] Sun Dec 27 2009 08:04:05 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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I have a killer machine there's noway its runningout of cpu causing the stuttering.
I will check out the config settings, thanks.
i started happening after I upgraded from 9.2 or watever the previous was to 9.10

the naming scheme is stupid, though less stupid than eclipse's.

[#] Fri Jan 01 2010 18:56:04 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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Here's an interesting step back in time.
MAny years ago I was unable to get a static ip at my house, but my dad was, so he signed up for acedsl and a static ip and I set up a linux machine for my dad to run a webserver and mail and for me to do whatever.
I've long since abandoned this machine for my uses, but my dad still uses it and I noticed last week that I couldn't log into it anymore. Nothing was wrong, but I made very few ways in, and all those ways went away.
So anyway, I went over today to open up some more holes in the firewall so I could log in.
I find when I ssh to it now, it says:
SSH-1.99-OpenSSH_3.4p1

I look on the web, and there's a known vulnerability with this version sigh.

Now the history.
I booted this machine. It's running a version of redhat so old there was no fedora.
The file dates are early 2003.
It's got a 686, with get this: 64meg of memory, and 2 gig of hard drive.
I think I slapped this machine together from parts.
Now I never touch this machine, never upgrade it never do anything, and as long as nobody hacks it, I'm fine until it dies of old age, which I'm amazed hasn't happened yet.

What to do. I don't want to spend money, and I don't want to spend any time, I just want this poor decision of mine from 7 years ago to go away.
Ican't upgrade ssh (I'm guessing) because there'll be zillions of dependancies that I won't be able to install, and even from source, I'm sure it wont compile on gcc (GCC) 3.2 20020903 (Red Hat Linux 8.0 3.2-7)
Red har linux appaerent was release sept 30 2002.

So, how do I keep this machine very getting hacked, and what do I do about it anyway.
This is why the tech upgrade cycle sucks. I just don't want to deal with this mess, but I have to do something.

[#] Fri Jan 01 2010 19:01:56 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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Oh, and to give you some perspective of what's runnig at my dad's house...
There's an IBM PC XT running there (complete with 5.25 disk drive) that runs an infralyzer (a spectrum analyzer he designed for his company in the 70's)
The software that runs the infralyzer was written for the PC, and thus has timing loops based on a 4.77Mhz clock cycle. If he runs it on anything faster the program reports that the instrument times out, because it burns through the timing loop so quickly.
Ahhh technology. No he doesn't have the source code, and he didn't write it.

sitting next to the XT is another AT class machine I think. It runs windows 3.1. I'm not exactly sure what it does but it's labeled "communications" so I think this is the one he runs email on. SMTP goes back a long way and still works. So figure he's never going to get a virus via email.
Then I think my linux box comes next in terms of patheticness.
Then there's 2 p200s with a gig of memory and some small hard drive. Not sur what they're for. And finally a laptop that I think most of you would recognize as coming from this century.

It's quite a museum over ther.
I meant to take pictures before I left to show you guys.

[#] Fri Jan 01 2010 20:03:02 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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hunh, you know? I just compiled the latest openssh sshd, and it built. Hunh.

[#] Sat Jan 02 2010 14:29:11 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Well yeah, OpenSSH was designed to run on OpenBSD, so it's not exactly expecting a robust operating system architecture to exist underneath it :)

[#] Sat Jan 02 2010 17:45:33 EST from ax25 @ Uncensored

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But I thought BSD was dead?



[#] Sat Jan 02 2010 19:21:45 EST from Omeron @ Uncensored

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Has anyone put Slackware on a Netbook? I think I will have to make a special version, since I need software speech synthesis, a screen-reader, etc. Fun times.

I have an Asus EeePC 1000HE.

[#] Sat Jan 02 2010 22:32:13 EST from cellofellow @ Uncensored

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Jan 2 2010 3:45pm from ax25 @uncnsrd
But I thought BSD was dead?


Well, BSD itself is long dead, but three spinoffs, FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD are still going strong. OpenBSD is focused on security 100%, no comprimises, and the OpenSSL and OpenSSH projects are spun off from OpenBSD.

-Josh

[#] Sun Jan 03 2010 10:16:31 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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But I thought BSD was dead?

Netcraft confirms it!

[#] Mon Jan 04 2010 05:24:45 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

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hm, didn't know caldera was founded "out of novell"

http://www.linux-mag.com/id/7651/2/



[#] Mon Jan 04 2010 07:46:33 EST from davew @ Uncensored

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Mon Jan 04 2010 05:24:45 AM EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

hm, didn't know caldera was founded "out of novell"

http://www.linux-mag.com/id/7651/2/



Did you not?

I did. Thats why it came with a Netware client.



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