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[#] Wed Nov 12 2008 11:26:43 EST from athos-mn @ Uncensored

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Gentoo and kernels <shiver>... Company we bought used Gentoo for all their servers, and the main system's kernel got corrupted, and no access to the guy who created it. Bye bye, system.

[#] Wed Nov 12 2008 11:52:25 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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That can go for any piece of software.

[#] Wed Nov 12 2008 18:36:41 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

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unless you have realy specific hardware, I don't see any reason why just a vanila kernel.org kernel should do the job.

you just need to know what you're doing.

I also had a company production mailserver with read errors stopping it from booting up replaced temporarily by that machine booted with grml.org, mount the partitions, and start sendmail inside of the chroot.

worked like a charm for over two weeks until the backup came in place ;-)



[#] Fri Nov 14 2008 16:25:30 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

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Girthta wants a Linux box that can support iTunes. Is that possible?

[#] Fri Nov 14 2008 16:26:05 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

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By 'possible', I sorta mean, has anyone tried to do this? I know, in theory, Wine should make it possible, but I also know that iTunes is weird.

[#] Fri Nov 14 2008 16:38:59 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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There are reports of it working. There are also other programs that do some of the same things.

[#] Fri Nov 14 2008 17:53:40 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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I found this neat thing called jharmony or something like that that will log in to itunes and get your key and take all your songs and turn them into unlocked mp3s.
But if you want to find out the hard way if you can run itunes in linux, I think you're in for a long weekend.

[#] Sat Nov 15 2008 14:08:35 EST from girthta @ Uncensored

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Hey,  OK. I had this room zapped because I don't know nothing about no penguins.

I'm wondering if we should make a room called "RTOOS" for this endeavor. Some might find my education process tedious.

I should also say it really doesn't matter if it's iTunes, actually. We want to play music. We want to play satellite radio and music. I'm thinking eventually we should also get a storage box- I keep seeing 1TB  boxes around for like less than $200 and it would be nice to have a place for all our music, movies and pictures.

Since  I don't know anything but can learn, and the rest of the family knows nothing and HAS to learn, I'd rather start sooner than later with putting together a box that is stable and suits our entertainment needs. If it's Linux, it has the added benefit of exposing (both myself and) the Noodle to alternative electronic lifestyles.



[#] Sat Nov 15 2008 14:12:21 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

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Okay, then, yes, there's a wonderful program you can use for handling your music right now, and it's completely free.  It's also better than iTunes, in my humble opinion, as it can stream music stations over the internet for you.

I use it at home.  You've probably seen that device on top of my stereo that keeps time.  It also plays music off my Linux machine.

http://www.slimdevices.com/su_downloads.html



[#] Sat Nov 15 2008 14:55:11 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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No need for a separate RTOOS room, as far as I'm concerned. Newcomers eager to learn Linux and open source, as well as seasoned old greybeards, are equally welcome.

There are a lot of different media options on Linux. If you're starting with a plain old Ubuntu install, you'll have Totem and RhythmBox, which together will get you most of the way there.

Another option is Songbird [ http://getsongbird.com/ ], which I haven't tried, but the demo they have on their site looks rather impressive.

Either way, the most important thing you need to know about playing media on Linux is that The Establishment has thrown a few obstacles in your way by patenting certain pieces of the puzzle so that there are some codecs which can't be included in the standard build. It's not hard to get around, especially on Ubuntu, where they've got it boiled down to simply clicking through a couple of warning messages about "you need to make sure this is legal in the country where you live" before downloading.

I'd be happy to participate in answering any questions that come up along the way.

[#] Sun Nov 16 2008 01:35:55 EST from Harbard @ Uncensored

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I am a big Amarok fan....for everything except video.  I've always had wierd things happen using VLC, although it will play almost anything out there.  JuK is ok...but I refuse to use all those KDE programs that use the letter K.  I'm kinda kontrary that way.  I have never been able to make Noatun work correctly and I just don't like the way Rythmbox is organized. 

[#] Sun Nov 16 2008 06:10:41 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

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I use mpd

 http://mpd.wikia.com/wiki/Music_Player_Daemon_Wiki

itsrunning headless, and there are several frontends.

plus a friend of  mine isstartinng to take the lead in development there ;-)



[#] Sun Nov 16 2008 07:49:35 EST from girthta @ Uncensored

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Hrm, OK. Which of these options allows you to "bookmark" radio stations you especially like? Do they all keep a "Library" of music and "playlists" like in iTunes? Because that will really come into play when we start getting serious about our music library (as in, getting a storage box and transferring all our music from CDs to the storage box). Which we (as in *I*) will eventually be doing. Then we (as in *I*) will put CDs into cold storage and live with a nice, clean, uncluttered music library.

Isn't this what you're doing now, fleeb? It's worked well for you, yes?



[#] Sun Nov 16 2008 07:51:36 EST from girthta @ Uncensored

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OK, new thread.

Please be kind when answering this question- how are we feeling about Uubuntu? I have, like, no money- being unemployed and all- so I'd like a free or extremely cheap option open to me but not at the expense of functionality. I'm not going to be creating my own open source software (though who knows what Noodle will eventually do) but I do need it to be functional and stable.

Should I go with Uubie or bite the red hat bullet?



[#] Sun Nov 16 2008 15:47:18 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Go with Ubuntu, it's the most polished and easy-to-use desktop Linux out there.
If you were building a server then Red Hat (or a Red Hat respin like CentOS) would be appropriate, but for a desktop, absolutely go with Ubuntu.

Ubuntu is end user Linux done right. It's easy when you want it to be, and powerful when you need it to be.

[#] Sun Nov 16 2008 17:22:03 EST from girthta @ Uncensored

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ok I spent a lot of today reading and downloading. I have to get some CDs to burn the download to, then I will geek out tomorrow while everyone's at work/school.

Stay tuned...



[#] Sun Nov 16 2008 18:22:20 EST from Harbard @ Uncensored

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There is a server version of Ubuntu also.  Ubuntu is the most popular and for me has been the most successful distro.  By that I mean it installed corectly and recognized all my hardware.  You still have to go to all the trouble of installing codecs to play movies and music.  Gnome is the default desktop, but it's easy to switch to KDE (my choice) or XFCE (better for a slower computer).

[#] Sun Nov 16 2008 18:27:01 EST from Harbard @ Uncensored

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Sun Nov 16 2008 07:49:35 EST from girthta@uncnsrd

Hrm, OK. Which of these options allows you to "bookmark" radio stations you especially like? Do they all keep a "Library" of music and "playlists" like in iTunes? Because that will really come into play when we start getting serious about our music library (as in, getting a storage box and transferring all our music from CDs to the storage box). Which we (as in *I*) will eventually be doing. Then we (as in *I*) will put CDs into cold storage and live with a nice, clean, uncluttered music library.

Isn't this what you're doing now, fleeb? It's worked well for you, yes?

Amarok and Rhythmbox both do this. In fact they do so many things..I don't even use 90% of it.  I mostly just want them to play my music library and be done with it.



[#] Sun Nov 16 2008 20:49:14 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

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Sun Nov 16 2008 07:49:35 EST from girthta@uncnsrd

Hrm, OK. Which of these options allows you to "bookmark" radio stations you especially like? Do they all keep a "Library" of music and "playlists" like in iTunes? Because that will really come into play when we start getting serious about our music library (as in, getting a storage box and transferring all our music from CDs to the storage box). Which we (as in *I*) will eventually be doing. Then we (as in *I*) will put CDs into cold storage and live with a nice, clean, uncluttered music library.

Isn't this what you're doing now, fleeb? It's worked well for you, yes?

I rip my music to ogg vorbis (the better-than-MP3 audio compression format) files.  The files are then uploaded to my dedicated Linux server running the aforementioned software (SqueezeCenter), and I tell the software to refresh the audio library (or wait until the next day, by which time it will do it automatically).  Within SqueezeCenter, you can sort through your music in a variety of ways... like genre, artists, albums, and year released.  The ID tag is important for making sure these work properly.  The player you can use with SqueezeCenter is Java, so it will work on your Linux platform as well as your Windows platform without issue.  Hell, it probably also works on Mac.

You can create playlists very easily in SqueezeCenter, although I haven't made many.  I think you can also save your preferred radio stations as 'favorites', although I haven't played with this as much.

I am sure there are some fine tools for ripping CDs to ogg vorbis or MP3 filesin Linux.  SqueezeCenter, however, doesn't come with that.

If you're feeling a little plucky, you can probably update the firmware in your iPod to use RockBox, which will continue to use ogg vorbis audio files for you (and it works well with Linux, I am sure).  I've been using RockBox on my iPod for a while now.

http://www.rockbox.org/ for more details on that.



[#] Sun Nov 16 2008 20:58:44 EST from fleeb @ Uncensored

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Let me describe this a little better...

SqueezeCenter is a server for your music.  It provides a web-page front-end for you to control it.  It has a shitload of features.

But, it's just a server.  It doesn't necessarily play the music over your speakers.  For that, you use a player (that comes with SqueezeCenter) that you should be able to install from the browser.  I know this works well in Windows, but I haven't actually seen the player in action over Linux.  Still, I should expect it wouldn't be too difficult to work with.

There's also some hardware that directly connects to the aforementioned server (if you point the hardware to the server).  I have one of these things sitting on top of my stereo (you've even seen it, although you might not remember it).  The hardware comes with a remote.

Because of the design, you can actually synchronize the music across all the players, so that everyone is playing the same music at exactly the same time.  I've tested this and saw that it works.  Kind of weird to have my stereo and computer playing the same music at exactly the same time.  This would work very nicely in a two-story home, as it would let you have a player upstairs and downstairs play at exactly the same time, so you won't have a break in the music you're enjoying as you wander around your home.  It isn't as useful in my condominium, for obvious reasons.

SqueezeCenter lets you set up your playlists, saving them, restoring them, editing them, and so on.  It lets you synchronize your players.  It even lets you direct what plays in the various players connected to it, and it does so nearly instantly.  But it doesn't actually play the music through your speakers.  That comes from the player application, which is also included.



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