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[#] Fri Jul 17 2009 11:01:29 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

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I think I'm starting to notice a pattern with the funny characters in messages. IG, do you use the text client or web? panasonic's message has them but your message does not.
anyway, I'm happy enough with my setup now. I got everything working, and switching it up won't buy me anything.
Although that directly routable port 80 is nice. To tell you the truth, I don't know if I ever actually tried it myself, I just assumed it didn't work.

I really like my static ip though. :-) Thanks again and still.

[#] Fri Jul 17 2009 23:12:25 EDT from PanaSonic @ Uncensored

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I noticed weird characters (mostly an "a" with some kind of accent mark on it) in most of the messages on here, when I used the text-mode Citadel client that came with my Citadel installation (9.37 debian install via apt-get).. I don't see them from the web interface, though, nor from telnet.  They also don't seem to happen on my own Citadel installation, however, I also haven't had anything in the way of local messages posted on there, just incoming spam mail.

 

 



[#] Sat Jul 18 2009 00:41:59 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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I really like my static ip though. :-) Thanks again and still.

The cost of the static IP is for you to let me show off my setup the next time you're here. :)

Seriously though, I'm glad you're enjoying it. It was a creative solution that got the job done well without doing anything particularly ugly.

And if I look at PS's messages I see the funny characters in them too. Now to figure out where they're coming from...

[#] Sat Jul 18 2009 00:57:13 EDT from PanaSonic @ Uncensored

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If it helps, I'm using the web interface to post with.  I didn't feel like digging up a Win32 ver of the citadel client, and I haven't yet figured out how to get an Xterm open to my linux box using a font size that's actually readable.

 



[#] Sat Jul 18 2009 06:39:51 EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

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do you use xming? or putty?



[#] Sat Jul 18 2009 09:13:23 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

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And if I look at PS's messages I see the funny characters in them too.

Now to figure out where they're coming from...

I fear they're coming from that swap text change I made. maybe that's not in your release though.

[#] Sun Jul 19 2009 09:49:21 EDT from fleeb @ Uncensored

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They happen when posting from WebCit, but I don't think it happens when posting from the text client.  They're only seen from within the text client.

Likely something went wacky with the HTML conversion code for the text client.



[#] Sun Jul 19 2009 10:25:59 EDT from PanaSonic @ Uncensored

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Sat Jul 18 2009 06:39:51 AM EDT from dothebart @ Uncensored

do you use xming? or putty?



Right now I'm using X-Win32, which works surprisingly well. But the limits of my system prevent me from running a modern window manager and desktop system on the Linux end :-S

 

 



[#] Sun Jul 26 2009 01:23:17 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

Subject: Photos of my FiOS installation

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A couple of people had asked some questions about my FiOS installation, so I figured I'd post everything here, and direct them to the BBS if they wanted to see the photos.

Evidently the "unusual" aspect of my installation is the indoor version of the Tellabs 612 ONT. Verizon normally mounts the ONT outdoors, with the power supply and battery backup units indoors, but they're happy to put the whole thing indoors if you ask them and if there's room. Evidently there's enough demand for this type of setup that Tellabs now manufactures an indoor version of the device, which has all three components in a single, non-weatherproof housing. The installer liked me because I had the site prepped with a big empty backboard on the wall, with power nearby, and telephone, television, and Ethernet cables all pre-installed to the location. All he had to do was bring in the fiber optic cable, mount up the ONT, and plug everything in. Here's what it looks like:

[ http://uncensored.citadel.org/~ajc/2009-1/DSC_2824.JPG ]

When ordering FiOS, I highly recommend requesting that they run the Internet connection over Ethernet instead of coax (MoCA). This gives you the ability to use the device of your choice as the outermost router/firewall (in my case, the usual dual-homed Linux machine). You will of course need to have the Ethernet cable already in place when they arrive, otherwise they'll charge you for inside wiring. In my setup, the Ethernet port on the ONT goes to the Internet connection of my server, so I can access it from the Internet using Dynamic DNS. Behind that server is the house LAN, which serves up DHCP and all the usual amenities. I moved Verizon's router onto the LAN, disabled its DHCP server, and configured it as an Ethernet/MoCA/Wireless bridge. It works well as a wireless-G access point, and the set-top box in the living room picks up an IP address on the same subnet as everything else. Here's what the setup looks like (the Verizon router is only barely visible; it's on the top of the cabinet)...

[ http://uncensored.citadel.org/~ajc/2009-1/DSC_2825.JPG ]

And yes, the big fat cat spends a lot of time in that chair. Right now I don't have a computer desk in the room, but I'm feeling inclined to put one back in soon. Even though I've outgrown the "look at my room full of computers" phase, it's still a nice quiet place to work.

The other home improvement is that I've totally stripped down the mishmosh of ugly cables that ran down the side of my house. The old copper telephone lines, the satellite cables, legacy cable television service, and various grounding leads are all gone. All that's left is a power cable and the single, slim, fiber optic cable for the FiOS service. Here's a photo of the side of the house, nice and clean with only two cables. All of the old cables are torn down, the various hardware removed, holes filled with putty, and ready for repainting:

[ http://uncensored.citadel.org/~ajc/2009-1/DSC_2827.JPG ]

So how's the service? Well, 25 megabits of non-oversubscribed Internet access is more bandwidth than I'd ever dreamed of having at home, of course. We used to have to ask the IGlet to stop playing his online games when someone was on the phone because there wasn't enough bandwidth for both to run at the same time without clipping. Now he can watch Phineas and Ferb on video-on-demand and there's no perceptible effect on the computer. (The telephone service does come in over a dedicated port, but even if we were on VoIP there'd still be plenty of bandwidth to go around.)

The television service is beautiful. It's easily the clearest picture I've seen, even at standard definition. Part of me wants to go out and buy a high-def television just to be able to take advantage of all the HD content to which we're already subscribed. As for the DVR ... well, it's true that nothing is as good as a TiVO, but I disagree with those who say it's so bad that it's practically unusable. It gets the job done. It's got a couple of quirks, but in general they do a decent job of integrating live tv, recording/recorded programs, and video-on-demand into the same system.

Our upstairs television doesn't have a DVR, or even the standard set-top box. A little homework revealed that they have something called a Motorola DCT-700 "digital adapter" which is basically a low-end cable box. It's strictly the brass tacks: no DVR, no on-screen guide, no VOD, no high definition, but it does tune in every standard-def channel to which you're subscribed, and it's $2/month less than the regular set-top box. It's also substantially smaller, which we liked because there was no good place for a big box in that location.

All in all it's an excellent service at a price that's lower than the cable company's equivalent, and less than I was paying before for phone+DSL+satellite. My whole family is quite happy with it.

 



[#] Mon Jul 27 2009 22:10:08 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Anyone out there (Freakdog?) in AT&T territory subscribed to U-Verse? Fiber to the neighborhood, and then they run VDSL to your house?

Seems like they were thinking "we're going to offer the fastest DSL in the industry" and then TV was an afterthought, and as a result they're already maxing out the technology. Is U-Verse as "already obsolete" as it seems to be at first glance?

With cable companies moving to DOCSIS 3.0 and Verizon rolling out FiOS, it seems like AT&T's offering isn't going to last long.

[#] Tue Jul 28 2009 11:33:20 EDT from Freakdog @ Dog Pound BBS II

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Mon Jul 27 2009 10:10:08 PM EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored
Anyone out there (Freakdog?) in AT&T territory subscribed to U-Verse? Fiber to the neighborhood, and then they run VDSL to your house?

Seems like they were thinking "we're going to offer the fastest DSL in the industry" and then TV was an afterthought, and as a result they're already maxing out the technology. Is U-Verse as "already obsolete" as it seems to be at first glance?

With cable companies moving to DOCSIS 3.0 and Verizon rolling out FiOS, it seems like AT&T's offering isn't going to last long.

I'm using the TV side of the service...I've got the internet side installed, but am not yet using it, as I'm going to have to rethink my entire setup.  I've been using an IPCop firewall system in front of everything else, for quite a while, and I won't be able to do that...the 2Wire gateway requires DHCP for IP allocation, and requires a separate physical interface for each and every IP.  I'll either need to install 2 or 3 more NICs into my firewall for each IP, or connect each of my internet facing systems to the gateway.

TV-wise, I like it, including the HD, but they employ compression for the HD feeds...when watching movies or anything with a lot of still frame (very little movement within the shot), you can see a level pixelation that makes it look like something's moving.

The TV service was actually supposed to be the primary focus of the U-Verse product, with the TV and the internet coming in over separate IP networks.  Whether or not they're coming in over separate frequencies/bandwidths, I do not know...but since Verizon isn't going to be able to roll out FIOS in those territories where they're not the ILEC, they won't have any effect on AT&T's offering...not sure what effect cable's move may have, if any.

Of course, when I worked for AT&T, I may have actually been able to pose this question and see what AT&T's answer might be...but I no longer have those channels available to me.



[#] Tue Jul 28 2009 13:00:07 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Actually, there are a few markets where Verizon is deploying FiOS as a CLEC.

What I read about U-Verse was:

* They've already maxed out the bandwidth; except under the best conditions they can't deliver two simultaneous HD streams, and their next planned move is to use pair bonding for additional bandwidth

* They do a lot of re-compression -- more so than cable or satellite (Verizon makes a big deal about how they retransmit every channel verbatim without recompressing it at all)

* The set top boxes crash and reboot a lot, which is no surprise considering that they are built using Microsoft technology

* People hate having enormous, ugly DSLAM huts in their neighborhoods.


On the other hand, it's "pure" IPTV, which from a technology perspective seems like a good idea. I don't know if they're using multicast, but it would seem to be the right way to do that.

With our FiOS service, I can easily tell whether I'm watching QAM or IPTV.
IPTV has obvious compression artifacts all over the place, while QAM is absolutely pristine all the time. I don't know, however, whether that's because they did a bad job encoding their on-demand library or if that is simply the nature of today's IPTV technology. What I do know is that if the whole service looked that bad I would be a very unhappy customer.

In the end, though, folks like us are the minority -- most people don't choose their broadband service based on the underlying technology; they choose one based on price, performance, and features. Cable's QAM/DOCSIS is probably the best bandwidth/ROI combination from the provider's point of view. AT&T's VDSL was cheap for them to deploy but if they can't keep up with video bandwidth demands they may end up regretting that decision.

The next couple of years are going to be very interesting to watch.

[#] Sun Aug 02 2009 17:02:25 EDT from Freakdog @ Dog Pound BBS II

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Well, I can't speak to having maxed out the bandwidth...I'm no longer with the company, so I don't have an easy path to that knowledge...as to the 2 simultaneous, HD streams, my experience is that's bunk. Everyone I know with the service, including myself, has no problem, at all, with dual HD streams...in my house, we routinely watch and/or record multiple HD streams all the time.

Not sure about recompression, but I do notice compression artifacts when watching certain movies or shows.

The set top box crashes are not that frequent...and with more recent updates to the software, it appears to be less frequent.

The DSLAMs are, by and large, below ground and as such, not particularly visible.

[#] Sun Aug 02 2009 23:42:45 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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"Crashes are not that frequent" sounds like the typical defense of a Microsoft product :)

We're all just totally loving FiOS, though. Uber bandwidth and pristine digital television. And a good thing, too, since it's been raining all summer here in Uncensoredland ... DirecTV would have been cutting out all over the place.

I did a little rewiring around the ONT today. It seemed incredibly stupid that they ran a ground wire from the ONT, which is indoors, to the outside of the house and grounded it to my electric meter, which is grounded back inside the house (via the water main). So I cut it all out and grounded it indoors. I also removed their silly CATV grounding block and replaced it with an attachment to the ground screw on my splitter.

I know I'm starting to sound like a fanboy here, but I'm still just amazed that someone was willing to run fiber optic cable all the way to my house.
Even ten years ago I never would have dreamed of having this much bandwidth.

[#] Mon Aug 03 2009 14:12:22 EDT from Freakdog @ Dog Pound BBS II

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"Crashes are not that frequent" sounds like the typical defense of a

Microsoft product :)

Maybe so...but I'm no fan of Microsoft. Still...if my set top boxes are crashing, it must be while I'm asleep or not at home, because I'm not seeing it happen.


That being said, I am experiencing one really annoying phenomenon...on the one STB that is connected via HDMI to my panel, there are times when the TV and STB will not sync up, and I have to perform a reset on the STB.

[#] Mon Aug 03 2009 16:19:48 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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I don't have any HDMI equipment, but I think a lot of people have problems like that, regardless of equipment vendor.

[#] Tue Aug 04 2009 07:26:06 EDT from Ragnar Danneskjold @ Uncensored

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I have HDMI, and I've never had syncing problems, but I've read about them.

[#] Tue Aug 04 2009 22:35:02 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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This is interesting...

http://www.dslreports.com/shownews/Verizon-Offers-20-Naked-DSL-103740

Verizon is evidently offering 1 Mbps naked DSL for $19.99 per month, if you order online. Not a bad deal if your needs are simple.

Someone on Broadband Reports suggested that "DSL is the new dialup."


Oh, and here's something for Ford:

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-10302336-93.html

Verizon is opening its FiOS TV "Widgets" API to third party developers. Evidently they will be playing the "app store" game -- but these apps will run on subscribers' television screens instead of their cell phones.

Citadel on your set top box, anyone? :)

[#] Wed Aug 05 2009 10:10:40 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

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Will they pay me?
This do-it-for-free shit is getting old.

[#] Wed Aug 05 2009 10:28:51 EDT from Ford II @ Uncensored

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Good, I can get paid.

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