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[#] Wed Jan 26 2011 11:01:52 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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"Help me to end this epidemic slaughter of the young." Wow.

[#] Wed Jan 26 2011 15:17:22 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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"Help me to sell helmets."

[#] Thu Jan 27 2011 21:49:30 EST from boo-boo @ Uncensored

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WHATT!!! I can't hear you!  I think my helmet's on too tight.



[#] Sat Jan 29 2011 15:16:58 EST from rudolf @ Uncensored

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I concluded I wouldn't buy a SUV. I can get a small pickup truck, or even a large one which will be more practical, safer, fuel efficient, etc. . Local rich dude(Hugh Morton) had a Buick sedan and a pickup truck. No SUV's at his house in Linville. My cousin, the fire chief, said Jeeps/CJ/Wrangler were useless compared to a 4wd pickup truck. I can take it to Galloway's and have Lester put all the eye candy I can afford on it. Winch, lift kit, skid plates.



[#] Sun Jan 30 2011 07:29:39 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

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heh, more pracical for shure. since you can load more..

but safer? probably only if there is something loaded; else your rear axis doesn't have the traction it needs to.

a friend of mine even had an al camino with _rear_ drive. guess what happened?

did a kickdown on a wet road, it went of into random direction, bang.



[#] Mon Jan 31 2011 16:37:08 EST from Spell Binder @ Uncensored

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It's probably more than obvious to state that driver skill has a definite impact on safety, but I'll give a brief example.

My family owns two cars. A GMC Yukon and a Mazda RX-8. For those unfamiliar, the Yukon is classified as a "full-size" SUV. It can seat seven people, or a crapload of cargo, or anywhere inbetween. It's huge, weighs a lot, has a nice hefty 5.2 liter engine block, and can tow a large load even when fully loaded. This is our vehicle for "long haul" trips as it provides the most comfort and cargo capacity.

The RX-8, on the other hand, is a sports car. Not as small as a typical roadster, but definitely smaller than a "mid-size" sedan or coupe. It can comfortably seat two people, plus two children or smaller (or very tolerant) adults in the back. Cargo capacity is medium to small. I've hauled groceries in it, but not much else. It's got a 1.3 liter rotary engine. Little to no towing capacity, but tops out around 200 MPH and can do 0 to 60 in around 6 seconds. This is my primary commuting vehicle.

On the occasions that I drive the Yukon, I drive in an almost completely different style than the RX-8. I accelerate and brake a lot less aggressively in the Yukon than I do in the RX-8. I'm much more careful to slow down when taking turns, and I tend to use the passing lane a lot less in the Yukon than I do in the RX-8. Just the simple knowledge that I'm driving a more massive, larger vehicle, tempers my attitude and reminds me that I need to be more conscious of how I drive. Not that I'm not conscious of my driving in the RX-8. With more manuverability and acceleration at my command, it definitely requires a lot of attention to drive safely in the RX-8 as well.
Driving Binder

[#] Mon Jan 31 2011 20:45:52 EST from Animal @ Uncensored

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Same logic goes for my truck vs. motorcycle.

The truck's big, slow, heavy, etc etc. But it can haul a shitload of
stuff.

The bike, OTOH, weighs 260lbs ready-to-ride. It's fast, and handles
-way- better than the truck does. It can go just about anywhere being
two feet wide and five feet long.

My accident/incident-avoidance "escape routes", if you will, vary
tremendously between the two. On the bike, I dump the clutch and
squeeze between the cars in front of me and let the idiot that "didn't
see me" hit that car. In the truck there's not much you can do at a
moment's notice like I can on the bike.

[#] Wed Feb 02 2011 16:20:37 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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Over the years I've come to realize it's easier to drive a sports car in some sense.
A sports car in the old sense, like the 60s where you had to fight with the car to make it do anything, might be some extra physical labor, but the car responds immediately, whereas a family sedan of some kind, you can't just point and punch it, there's a lot of laggy body roll.
With todays "sports cars" that have all the performance of a 60s sports car plus all the power options of any modern day car, (power brakes, power steering, etc) it really is painfully easy to drive a sports car. You don't have to plan or think ahead "how much will I have to oversteer to get the car THAT far over in the lane at 80mph", you just point and it goes.
In that sense the sports car is a better driving deal.

[#] Wed Feb 02 2011 18:14:06 EST from Spell Binder @ Uncensored

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I agree. Modern sports cars can integrate engine control, tranmission control, and traction and stability control to the point where, in the high-end performance cars, an almost untrained driver can just about compete with a professional racer.

With what I've read about the advances in electronic control of automatic transmissions, I may go with an automatic (with manual override and paddle-shifters, though) instead of a manual transmission. In many cases, the programming is sophisticated enough that you'd have to be professional race-car driver to outperform the automatic version with a manual transmission.
Auto Binder

[#] Wed Feb 02 2011 21:13:41 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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the problem with that paddle shifter stuff is that you lose that whole clutch-and-slam-it-into-third thing. I never wanna give that up.

[#] Thu Feb 03 2011 15:23:00 EST from Spell Binder @ Uncensored

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I don't have a car with paddle-shifters to test this out on, but I would think that if you click the paddles fast enough, the transmission would skip the interim gears and shift directly into the desired target gear. e.g. If you're downshifting from 5th to 3rd, clicking the paddle twice fast enough should cause it to go directly from 5th to 3rd without shifting into 4th gear.

Admittedly, not exactly the same with an H-pattern stick-shift, but almost the same end-result. :P
Shift Binder

[#] Tue Feb 08 2011 17:51:50 EST from dothebart @ Uncensored

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http://hm7.tumblr.com/post/3111143040

You are not stuck in the traffic, you are the traffic! Get a bike. Break free.



[#] Sat Feb 12 2011 14:08:38 EST from rudolf @ Uncensored

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There's a Scion TC in my carport. It's nice, but lightweight. There are some roads here that a heavier car (Crown Vic) will do well on. The Scion can hit sand and skid, especially on the Devil's Backbone road, otherwise known as US 221.



[#] Sat Feb 12 2011 14:47:08 EST from rudolf @ Uncensored

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I'm glad I didn't tell some lady that Joe Ratzinger and Ms. Palin are in my car club. But we're non-political by definition. Just a bunch of diesel nuts. Ol' Joe used to get lots of citations from the polizia. They're glad he has a driver these days.



[#] Sun Feb 13 2011 22:59:08 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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gear. e.g. If you're downshifting from 5th to 3rd, clicking the paddle

twice fast enough should cause it to go directly from 5th to 3rd
without shifting into 4th gear.

I'm gonna go ahead and doubt that until it gets proven. Paddle shifters are hooked up to a computer that's basically an electronic automatic transmission running in a driver-supervised mode. If the computer sees you doing something like trying to hop multiple gears at once, it's probably going to execute it as a smooth series of shifts.

The computer is *not* your friend.

[#] Mon Feb 14 2011 12:54:08 EST from skpacman @ Uncensored

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If the computer sees you doing something like trying to hop multiple gears at once, it's probably going to execute it as a smooth series of shifts.

 

agreed. the computer is either not smart enough to know to shift from 3rd to 5th at a certain RPM, or it's too smart to let the user make a dangerous decision to jump gears.



[#] Mon Feb 14 2011 15:16:41 EST from Spell Binder @ Uncensored

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I can concede the point. Especially since, AFAIK, existing automatic transmissions won't downshift if the resulting engine RPM is too high, either.

[#] Tue Feb 15 2011 11:56:17 EST from skpacman @ Uncensored

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Especially since, AFAIK, existing automatic transmissions won't downshift if the resulting engine RPM is too high, either.

Thus why I so enjoy my good old stick-and-clutch manual transmission... it doesn't care about where I shift beyond warning me with a high rpm rev.



[#] Tue Feb 15 2011 22:53:43 EST from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Heh. "Grind it!"

[#] Wed Feb 16 2011 23:24:37 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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Thus why I so enjoy my good old stick-and-clutch manual
transmission... it doesn't care about where I shift beyond warning me
with a high rpm rev.

You ever try to shift into first while going 50mph? You can't, even with the clutch depressed. I mean you can if you push really really really hard, but the synchros would have to get the engine side of the tranny going so fast (well beyond redline were you to let off the clutch, engine redline I mean) and doing that takes a lot of energy on your part to move all that transmission at that speed, it's really hard to do.
The mechanics of the car don't stop you from doing it, but the physics of the car does.

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