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[#] Thu Jan 11 2007 16:32:23 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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But the opposite, what you suggest, isn't really feasible for much of

hte oiling depends on the engine rotating like cylinder walls and
rocker arms, lifters, and valve guides.

not in current engine designes, but if it was REALLY that important, which obviously it's not, they'd make little ducts where the oil pump could shoot oil just for cold start purpopses...

[#] Thu Jan 11 2007 16:55:42 EST from Ragnar Danneskjold @ Uncensored

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Even though there is great dependence on the engine turning, I'd rather have full oil pressure at start, instead of a few second where the pump is pushing oil around the engine. In some engines, there are actually ports that shoot oil towards the underside of the piston, allowing more spark advance because they're keeping the piston cooler. In that situation, the cylinder walls would be getting oiled, even without the engine turning.

[#] Fri Jan 12 2007 01:55:20 EST from curly surmudgeon @ Dog Pound BBS II

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Speaking of the rust, what's the best, and cheapest, and easiest way

to deal with the rust, besides just leaving it alone to let it continue

to eat my car ???

Unless it's the chassis just ignore it.

[#] Fri Jan 12 2007 01:58:04 EST from curly surmudgeon @ Dog Pound BBS II

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spark advance because they're keeping the piston cooler. In that
situation, the cylinder walls would be getting oiled, even without the

engine turning.

Not if they use the same oiling system as a regular engine where the crankshaft must align with the rod bearing. I can't imagine it working otherwise. If that's the case then the piston/cylinder wall wouldn't get oil even if there is pressure unless the crank is in the perfect position and even then only one cylinder would get greased.

Best bet is to just use synthetic oil and not race your engine for 60 seconds after ignition.

[#] Fri Jan 12 2007 11:22:07 EST from Ragnar Danneskjold @ Uncensored

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I've got an old Pontiac engine sitting around... I may drop the pan on it, put the oil pickup in a can full of oil, then spin the oil pump with a drill through the distributor hole and see where oil winds up.... I'm curious where we see oil coming from.

[#] Fri Jan 12 2007 11:37:11 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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then you'll BLOW IT UP!!!!

I just saw my first episode of "BLOW IT UP!!!!" or whatever it's called.

[#] Sat Jan 13 2007 01:10:16 EST from harry @ Haven BBS

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The rust that I can see and care about is on the front of the hood. I'm guessing it's from stones hitting the car hood, tossed up by other vehicles.


Right now, the largest is about a one inch diameter, and I don't want it to get much bigger. It's more a cosmetic issue than anything else. After all, the car's a 1991 model with over 260,000 miles on it and I rather doubt I'll be selling it anytime soon.

I'd just like to arrest the rusting process, first, and then cover the rust spot with some silver/gray paint that is close to the faded silver body color.



I just don't want the rust spot to continue growing and cause more paint to flake off.

[#] Sat Jan 13 2007 17:14:16 EST from flyingfsck @ Uncensored

Subject: Stupid tire leak

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Howdy,

Does anyone know whether it is feasible to replace a tubeless tire valve stem without removing the tire from the rim? If so, how should I go about it?

 Cheers,

F. 



[#] Sat Jan 13 2007 17:58:57 EST from 2Dog @ Uncensored

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Flyingfuck:

Deflate said tire, remove from rim, and replace valve. That's pretty much it.



[#] Sat Jan 13 2007 18:13:55 EST from 2Dog @ Uncensored

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(and by that... I didn't mean tear the rubber off. Simply lay the uniflated tire on the
ground/driveway, push the rubber aside, and replace the valve yourself.

[#] Sat Jan 13 2007 22:11:53 EST from flyingfsck @ Uncensored

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OK, I have fixed my fair share of bicycle tires, so I have a fair idea, but a car tire is a so much bigger and springier piece.  So I can imagine getting my fingers stuck in there - or being unable to inflate it again, once the bead is broken - That is my reason for caution.

Someone mentioned to me, that after the bead was broken, to pour a little soap water onto the broken side and that I should be able to get it to seat it again, even just with using a manual pump.  Could you confirm that?



[#] Sun Jan 14 2007 19:33:43 EST from 2Dog @ Uncensored

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I think your're fairly safe there.

As for the soap & water; whenever you have gone to a tire shop to have a flat
fixed, or even a new set of tires put on...
Have you ever seen them spritzing soap solution to ensure a better seal? NEVER.
Soap solution is sprayed on to detect leaks, not to perfect a bead seal. Although, it
does sound fun... a bunch of soapy water, some young cheerleaders, wet t-shirts, Wheeee! :^)

[#] Mon Jan 15 2007 17:02:41 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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I've heard it's a nightmare to reseat a tire unless you've got a decent pump. Never tried it myself.
I have a wheelbarrow that I had to reinflate and I used my shitty little electric pump and I had a hard time getting it to take, a car tire is much much bigger.

[#] Tue Jan 16 2007 06:23:57 EST from Curly Surmudgeon @ Haven BBS

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Jan 13 2007 6:13pm from 2Dog @uncnsrd (Uncensored)
(and by that... I didn't mean tear the rubber off. Simply lay the
uniflated tire on the
ground/driveway, push the rubber aside, and replace the valve
yourself.


Often you can't just push the bead off the rim. Lay the tire beneath the brake drum/disk and lower the car to break the bead on one side. Lift the car again and do it again 90 degrees out. Lift again and pull the tire out and you can probably use your foot to push the tire off.

Put a piece of tape across the inside of the rim locking it into place then use a pair of channel lock pliers to pull the stem out. Many times it will break leaving a chunk of itself inside the tire which requires dismounting to remove, ergo the tape.

Be careful not to mess up the new stem when installing. Do not remove the valve core as it imparts some structural integrity while pulling, or prying, with pliers to install. Use soapy water to lube.


It's unlikely you'll inflate a tubeless tire with a hand pump or even one of those little 12vdc emergency pumps, drag it to a gas station so you have the velocity needed. Don't worry about lubricating the tire/rim because it just came off that same position, you haven't rotated it because the back side is still seated. Either look away or wear glasses while inflating. When the bead pops into place it can do so at almost supersonic speed propelling debris hard and far.

[#] Tue Jan 16 2007 07:16:08 EST from Curly Surmudgeon @ Haven BBS

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Jan 11 2007 4:32pm from Ford II @uncnsrd (Uncensored)
But the opposite, what you suggest, isn't really feasible for much

of

hte oiling depends on the engine rotating like cylinder walls and

rocker arms, lifters, and valve guides.

not in current engine designes, but if it was REALLY that important,


I'm curious, which engines are you speaking of? I've _never_ seen a reciprocating engine that continuously oils the cylinder walls. _Every_ one I've been in had one of two oiling methods: 1) a "dipper" that grabs a bit of oil from the pan (rare and only on very old engines) then throws it on the cylinder walls at it reaches perihelion or 2) internal passages inside the crankshaft which oil the rod and main bearings, often not continuous, often supplimented by more inlets from the block. In the connecting rod / crankshaft journal there is usually a small hole drilled in the rod that aligns with the crankshaft at one position in its rotation. When the two align a small squirt of oil is shot onto the cylinder wall. This is the only system I've seen in an engine since about 1936 or so.

If there is something new in this department I would love to hear about it, I've been a motorhead all my life. In the 60's I played with desmodromic valves, in the 70's with turbos, in the 80's with piezo direct fuel injection, in the 80's I worked on a 2-cycle diesel engine, have patents in the automotive test industry for the first computer wheel balancers, front end aligners, and smog testers.

So if I'm missing something don't keep me waiting with baited breath...

[#] Tue Jan 16 2007 10:16:38 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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question for you bobble heads.

7 yr old gti, misfires only when it's cold and has sat overnight in the rain.
I replaces wires and plugs, it's less worse, but it just did it again last night.
where's the water getting to? if not water, what is it?

[#] Tue Jan 16 2007 10:21:07 EST from Ragnar Danneskjold @ Uncensored

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Distributor cap? I'd replace the rotor and cap next.

[#] Tue Jan 16 2007 10:37:02 EST from Ford II @ Uncensored

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erm 7 years, 1999, not that old. good idea though...

[#] Tue Jan 16 2007 16:40:11 EST from curly surmudgeon @ Dog Pound BBS II

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What does the exhaust smell like while misfiring?

By the way, mileage and heat determine distributor cap lifespan, not age.

[#] Tue Jan 16 2007 21:00:05 EST from Animal @ Uncensored

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heh, /me goes to sniff his exhaust to determine if anything is wrong
it smells like it's not getti....*thunk*




*twitch*

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