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[#] Sat Aug 17 2013 17:20:27 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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I'm normally skeptical of "As Seen On TV" products, but ... I admit ... I bought one:

[ http://www.pivotrim.com/ ]

Whenever I use my trimmer I always spend way too much time replacing lines.
I've gotten pretty good at avoiding obstacles but it's still a pain in the neck. So I bought a "PivoTrim" after seeing the commercial on Fox News (which assures there's no liberal agenda).

It really does work. I trimmed right up against rocks and fences and stuff, just like in the commercial, and the lines didn't break.

This thing should be standard equipment on all trimmers.

[#] Sat Aug 17 2013 17:28:47 EDT from triLcat @ Uncensored

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Our washer just died, and we're replacing a 5kg with a 7kg. Still not as big as an American machine, and takes like 5x as long to go through a load, but a big improvement anyway.



[#] Sun Aug 18 2013 01:23:08 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

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I'm normally skeptical of "As Seen On TV" products, but ... I admit
... I bought one:


I love these products because they always have buffoons demonstrating why the tradition way is just too hard.
But I always get exvited when I hear "The secret is..."

[#] Sun Aug 18 2013 06:14:23 EDT from triLcat @ Uncensored

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I have a tendency to enjoy the home shopping network... and I love the as-seen-on-tv stuff, but experience shows that most of the stuff is really cheap crap.

 



[#] Sun Aug 18 2013 09:15:57 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

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I worked for the cable company and there was one channel that had a lot of infomercials. It was pay per sale
channel. That channel had a unique phone number, whenever somebody called that number and made an order the
company that the number was assigned to would get paid. The guy who ran that operation would get free samples
of all the stuff. He always thought the stuff was fantastic. Maybe because it was free, maybe because he was
gullible. I remember him talking about how great he thought the steam wand was, I said of course it is, it is
hot water.
It was all cheap crap, some of the stuff was a good idea, at least in theory, but cheap as hell.

[#] Sun Aug 18 2013 10:27:19 EDT from DemonStalker @ Dog Pound BBS II

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The best places to buy those 'seen on tv' thingees - there are two:

If you are lucky you may live near one of those "As Seen On TV" stores. Good places to browse. Some of the stuff really is *not* junk and you get to look, touch, etc. and make a reasonably informed decision.

The others are Wallmart, Target and K-mart. Each of those have "As Seen On TV" areas/aisles and only stock the better of the items.

I can personally speak to the "Olde Brooklyn Lantern." It is basically an LED light thingee in the shape of an old-fashioned oil lantern. Looks ok at a distance, cheaply made, but works **very** well. In fact, after finding that out I have actually accumulated four of the things. I live in an area of the Cascade foothills where, in winter, power blackouts are rather common during our rainstorms. These lanterns make strong, usable, and safe light sources. Pair of D batteries to power each lamp, and they last for a VERY long while.

If you go camping, or have even the remote need for emergency lighting - go buy one - roughy $12 at Walmart - worth every cent.



[#] Sun Aug 18 2013 12:21:31 EDT from triLcat @ Uncensored

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So much fun - they're really good at making you believe that their products can really solve some problem you didn't even know you had!



[#] Sun Aug 18 2013 12:28:34 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

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My sister purchased one of those Magic Bullet blenders, and she loved it so much she purchased everyone else in
the family one. I use it enough, it is a great quick mixer/blender. I have seen higher end models in stores
since the release of the Magic Bullet but the Magic Bullet is still going strong.

[#] Sun Aug 18 2013 15:22:04 EDT from triLcat @ Uncensored

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cool. once in a while, they do make one that's good. Just so many are so cheaply made...



[#] Sun Aug 18 2013 23:15:29 EDT from ax25 @ Uncensored

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Sat Aug 17 2013 05:28:47 PM EDT from triLcat @ Uncensored

Our washer just died, and we're replacing a 5kg with a 7kg. Still not as big as an American machine, and takes like 5x as long to go through a load, but a big improvement anyway.



I found that the hold up was the carbon bit (mostly male) was the hold-up.  Keep the door open if it is a front loader and blow a fan if you care to keep it a long time (just enough to dry it out).

Ax25 - thanks triL.



[#] Sun Aug 18 2013 23:26:02 EDT from ax25 @ Uncensored

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Ok, so my 80,000 btu / hr natural gas furnace is dead.  I did some tricks this spring to help it out, but at $1200$ + to replace the inducer motor on a 1997 model (with 90% efficiency it still seems like a bad deal.

I googled the model Bryant 355MAV

355MAV042000ACKA - more specifically

80,000 BTU/HR input.

Not sure what I should buy as this one went the distance for a 16 year old furnace (predicated lifetime of 15-20 years).

What do the other Uncensored handyman-or- handy woman think I should buy?

Fixing it would mean buying a $1200 part plus having the possibility of the heat ex-changer crack at some point... Ugh. 

Ax25



[#] Sun Aug 18 2013 23:59:34 EDT from vince-q @ Uncensored

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Depending on where you live there are lots of options.

I am in a very rural area. Most folk here on "the mountain" do the majority of their home heating with (don't laugh) wood!

If you have the space, consider wind power and solar to take your home "off the (electric) grid" and get an electric furnace. This is *not* a cheap solution, but the fascinating byproduct is that you will be getting rid of your electric bill and, if the systems are installed correctly and interface with "the grid" you will end up selling power *to* your electric utility. Investigate your local laws. Here in California, the power company is *required* to accept your electricity and to compensate you for it at the published tariff rate (what you'd ordinarily be paying *them*). I know a number of folks here that have done this and, at the end of the year, they end up ****way**** ahead of the game. But then, the climate here is very much in our favor in that it stops raining in mid-May and with the exception of a *very* rare day or two here and there, it is continuously sunny (except at night!) until roughly Hallowe'en. And during "rainy season" it tends to also be windy, which is when that wind-power gets generated.

The bad part in all that is that it will set you back about thirty grand, maybe even more, to get it all bought, installed, etc. You'll make that money back in less than ten years, though. And a good chunk of the initial expense has preferential tax treatment(s) available. Also, your local power company may actually have a program to pay you (rebates) to do this.

It's definitely worth exploring.



[#] Mon Aug 19 2013 00:07:38 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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I love these products because they always have buffoons demonstrating why
the tradition way is just too hard.

That's because they're being shown in black and white, usually with a red "X" over them!

[#] Mon Aug 19 2013 00:12:07 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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I can personally speak to the "Olde Brooklyn Lantern." It is

Hey, I've got one of those too. Received it as a gift last year. Aside from being a really bright and long-lasting LED light source, its design is whimsical enough that we have it hanging from a hook in the main area of our house where a hanging plant might go. My kids get freaked out by blackouts so we keep lots of flashlights and lightsticks around (plus a 6500 watt diesel generator of course).

[#] Mon Aug 19 2013 00:14:20 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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What do the other Uncensored handyman-or- handy woman think I should
buy?

Is this a forced air heating system?

[#] Mon Aug 19 2013 00:16:26 EDT from ax25 @ Uncensored

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Yep.  Forced air.  No boiler in sight.



[#] Mon Aug 19 2013 00:23:34 EDT from ax25 @ Uncensored

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Sun Aug 18 2013 11:59:34 PM EDTfrom vince-q @ Uncensored

Depending on where you live there are lots of options.

I am in a very rural area. Most folk here on "the mountain" do the majority of their home heating with (don't laugh) wood!

 

Thanks for the wood alternative, but I don't quite fit the hunter / gatherer mindset.  I am a child of the 70's with the Carter "wear a sweater" mindset, and I think we can do better heating our caves given current tech, but I might be wrong.

If you have the space, consider wind power and solar to take your home "off the (electric) grid" and get an electric furnace. This is *not* a cheap solution, but the fascinating byproduct is that you will be getting rid of your electric bill and, if the systems are installed correctly and interface with "the grid" you will end up selling power *to* your electric utility. Investigate your local laws. Here in California, the power company is *required* to accept your electricity and to compensate you for it at the published tariff rate (what you'd ordinarily be paying *them*). I know a number of folks here that have done this and, at the end of the year, they end up ****way**** ahead of the game. But then, the climate here is very much in our favor in that it stops raining in mid-May and with the exception of a *very* rare day or two here and there, it is continuously sunny (except at night!) until roughly Hallowe'en. And during "rainy season" it tends to also be windy, which is when that wind-power gets generated.

I have considered the costs of going "all in", but at present, in the climbs of Minnesota, it might be a bit more that than $25 -$30K to unplug - heating and power.  Power, I could wing that over time and do fine.  The BTU's/hour is the main issue.  Getting enough time to clear a field to reap the benefits of burning wood is quite a task in itself.

 



[#] Mon Aug 19 2013 08:25:53 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Thanks for the wood alternative, but I don't quite fit the hunter /
gatherer mindset.  I am a child of the 70's with the Carter "wear a
sweater" mindset, and I think we can do better heating our caves
given current tech, but I might be wrong.

Well, now that Carter II and the associated mega-high fuel prices are here, it's time to think about this kind of thing again. (Hey the setup was too good to resist)

So obviously what you need to install is a ground source heat pump. The deployment costs are very high, because you have to sink a bunch of wells into the ground. But the cost of operation is very low.

[#] Tue Aug 20 2013 18:47:49 EDT from zooer @ Uncensored

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My kids get freaked out by blackouts so we keep


Really? Freaked out by loss of power. When this happens you need to put on a Jason mask and fire up the
chainsaw.

[#] Tue Aug 20 2013 21:44:38 EDT from IGnatius T Foobar @ Uncensored

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Not possible -- my chainsaw is electric :)

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